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Boekenoogen was a family which originally lived in West Flanders in Belgium. Joos Bouckenoghe (Boekenoogen), head chaplain at Bruges and priest of the Roman Catholic Church at Ledeghem, was converted to the Mennonites and settled at Haarlem in the Netherlands as a weaver about 1580. His son Willem was also a Mennonite, but most of Willem's children became Quakers; one of them, Jan, emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1684 and was one of the first settlers of Philadelphia. Five of the children of Tanneken Symons B. (d. 1670 at Haarlem) were Quakers though she herself was apparently a Mennonite. The children of Jan B., a son of Willem and a velvet weaver, were, however, Mennonites about 1731, first in Amsterdam and afterward in Haarlem.

A grandson of this Jan Boekenoogen, called Jan Gerrit Boekenoogen, b. at Haarlem 1802 and d. at Beverwijk 1877, married to Johanna Overbeek, studied at the Mennonite Theological Seminary at Amsterdam and became a ministerial candidate in 1826; he served the Mennonite congregations of Ouddorp 1826-1827 and Wormerveer-Zuid 1827-1863. His son Lucas Fredrik Boekenoogen (1830-1909) was a manufacturer of vegetable oils at Wormerveer and became very well-to-do. He was married to Agatha Maria van Gelder. Jan Gerrit Boekenoogen and Gerrit Jacob Boekenoogen were their sons.



Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1953


Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Boekenoogen family." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 20 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Boekenoogen_family&oldid=54883.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (1953). Boekenoogen family. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Boekenoogen_family&oldid=54883.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 379. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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