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[[File:boynton.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Boynton Mennonite Church, Hopedale, Illinois, USA
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[[File:boynton.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Boynton Mennonite Church, Hopedale, Illinois, USA<br />
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Source: [http://www.boyntonmennonite.org/Home Church website]'']]
  
Source: [http://www.boyntonmennonite.org/Home Church website]'']]    The Boynton Mennonite Church ([[Evangelical Mennonite Church (United States)|Fellowship of Evangelical Churches]]), on the north edge of Boynton Township, [[Tazewell County (Illinois)|Tazewell County]], [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], initially belonged to the [[Central Conference Mennonite Church|Central Conference of Mennonites]] (later [[Central District Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Central District Conference]]). Due to the desire of several Hessian Mennonite families, who differed from their [[Amish|Amish]] (now Mennonite) neighbors culturally, the congregation was organized on 15 September 1901 under the guidance of [[Schantz, Peter (1853-1924)|Peter Schantz]] of Danvers, Illinois. The original meetinghouse, dedicated 14 September 1902, still served the congregation in 1953 when it numbered 104. After 1942 the church also owned a parsonage in Hopedale.
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The Boynton Mennonite Church ([[Evangelical Mennonite Church (United States)|Fellowship of Evangelical Churches]]), on the north edge of Boynton Township, [[Tazewell County (Illinois)|Tazewell County]], [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], initially belonged to the [[Central Conference Mennonite Church|Central Conference of Mennonites]] (later [[Central District Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Central District Conference]]). Due to the desire of several Hessian Mennonite families, who differed from their [[Amish Mennonites|Amish]] (now Mennonite) neighbors culturally, the congregation was organized on 15 September 1901 under the guidance of [[Schantz, Peter (1853-1924)|Peter Schantz]] of Danvers, Illinois. The original meetinghouse, dedicated 14 September 1902, still served the congregation in 1953 when it numbered 104. After 1942 the church also owned a parsonage in Hopedale.
  
 
In 1967 the congregation voted to build a new church in the village of Hopedale. The first worship service was held on 19 July 1970. In September 1980 a church spire and sign were dedicated. On 13 June 2004 the church broke ground for an new sanctuary and fellowship hall attached to the existing building. In July of 2006 Boynton held the first Sunday morning service in the new sanctuary. The 2009 membership was 72.
 
In 1967 the congregation voted to build a new church in the village of Hopedale. The first worship service was held on 19 July 1970. In September 1980 a church spire and sign were dedicated. On 13 June 2004 the church broke ground for an new sanctuary and fellowship hall attached to the existing building. In July of 2006 Boynton held the first Sunday morning service in the new sanctuary. The 2009 membership was 72.

Revision as of 14:35, 4 October 2013

Contents

Boynton Mennonite Church, Hopedale, Illinois, USA
Source: Church website

The Boynton Mennonite Church (Fellowship of Evangelical Churches), on the north edge of Boynton Township, Tazewell County, Illinois, initially belonged to the Central Conference of Mennonites (later Central District Conference). Due to the desire of several Hessian Mennonite families, who differed from their Amish (now Mennonite) neighbors culturally, the congregation was organized on 15 September 1901 under the guidance of Peter Schantz of Danvers, Illinois. The original meetinghouse, dedicated 14 September 1902, still served the congregation in 1953 when it numbered 104. After 1942 the church also owned a parsonage in Hopedale.

In 1967 the congregation voted to build a new church in the village of Hopedale. The first worship service was held on 19 July 1970. In September 1980 a church spire and sign were dedicated. On 13 June 2004 the church broke ground for an new sanctuary and fellowship hall attached to the existing building. In July of 2006 Boynton held the first Sunday morning service in the new sanctuary. The 2009 membership was 72.

In June 2012 the church notified the Central District Conference that it was leaving the Conference and was joining the Fellowship of Evangelical Churches. The congregation had begun to discern its ties to the Conference in 2009 and made the final decision after three same-sex civil unions had been performed by the pastor of another church in the conference.

Bibliography

"3 Churches Leave Western, Central Districts." Mennonite World Review (15 October 2012). Web. 19 October 2012. http://www.mennoworld.org/2012/10/15/3-churches-leave-western-central-districts/.

 "Boynton Mennonite History." Boynton Mennonite Church. Web. 30 September 2009. http://www.boyntonmennonite.org/history/historyMain.html.

Additional Information

Address: 326 Jefferson Street, Hopedale, Illinois

Phone: 309-449-5503

Website: Boynton Mennonite Church

Denominational Affiliations:

Central District Conference

Mennonite Church USA

Fellowship of Evangelical Churches

Maps

Map:Boynton Mennonite Church (Hopedale, Illinois)


Author(s) Melvin F. Funk
Richard D. Thiessen
Date Published October 2012


Cite This Article

MLA style

Funk, Melvin F. and Richard D. Thiessen. "Boynton Mennonite Church (Hopedale, Illinois, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. October 2012. Web. 24 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Boynton_Mennonite_Church_(Hopedale,_Illinois,_USA)&oldid=102072.

APA style

Funk, Melvin F. and Richard D. Thiessen. (October 2012). Boynton Mennonite Church (Hopedale, Illinois, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 24 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Boynton_Mennonite_Church_(Hopedale,_Illinois,_USA)&oldid=102072.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 399. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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