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The Brandon Mennonite Church, sometimes referred to as a preaching point, was located in a small eastern [[Colorado (USA)|Colorado]] farming community that had developed along the Missouri Pacific Railroad some 85 miles northeast of La Junta during the late 1880s. The congregation was formally established and received into the [[Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference]] in 1911. [[Heatwole, Jacob Aaron (1871-1940)|Jacob A. Heatwole]], an ordained [[Virginia Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Virginia Mennonite Conference]] minister who had moved to Fairmount (present-day Swink), Colorado, in 1907, and would be ordained as a Bishop in the Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference at La Junta in 1919, served as a visiting minister to the small Brandon congregation during 1910-14. The congregation, which was listed in the <em>[[Mennonite Yearbook and Directory|Mennonite Yearbook]]</em> 1913-18 with 18 members, remained under the pastoral care of the La Junta ministers during its brief tenure. By 1919 the congregation was no longer listed in the <em>Mennonite Yearbook</em>.
 
The Brandon Mennonite Church, sometimes referred to as a preaching point, was located in a small eastern [[Colorado (USA)|Colorado]] farming community that had developed along the Missouri Pacific Railroad some 85 miles northeast of La Junta during the late 1880s. The congregation was formally established and received into the [[Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference]] in 1911. [[Heatwole, Jacob Aaron (1871-1940)|Jacob A. Heatwole]], an ordained [[Virginia Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Virginia Mennonite Conference]] minister who had moved to Fairmount (present-day Swink), Colorado, in 1907, and would be ordained as a Bishop in the Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference at La Junta in 1919, served as a visiting minister to the small Brandon congregation during 1910-14. The congregation, which was listed in the <em>[[Mennonite Yearbook and Directory|Mennonite Yearbook]]</em> 1913-18 with 18 members, remained under the pastoral care of the La Junta ministers during its brief tenure. By 1919 the congregation was no longer listed in the <em>Mennonite Yearbook</em>.
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Unrau, Harlan D.  <em>In Pursuit of Land, Health and Mission:  A History of Mennonites in the Mountain States Region</em>.  Printed in Canada by Blitzprint Inc.  2007.
 
Unrau, Harlan D.  <em>In Pursuit of Land, Health and Mission:  A History of Mennonites in the Mountain States Region</em>.  Printed in Canada by Blitzprint Inc.  2007.
 
 
 
= Additional Information =
 
= Additional Information =
 
<h3>Original Article from Mennonite Encyclopedia</h3> <strong>Vol. 1, p. 405 by Melvin Gingerich</strong>
 
<h3>Original Article from Mennonite Encyclopedia</h3> <strong>Vol. 1, p. 405 by Melvin Gingerich</strong>
  
 
Brandon, [[Colorado (USA)|Colorado]] was a preaching point ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]) under the [[Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Kansas-Nebraska Conference]], and was listed in the <em>[[Mennonite Yearbook and Directory|Mennonite Yearbook]] </em>1913-1918 with 18 members.
 
Brandon, [[Colorado (USA)|Colorado]] was a preaching point ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]) under the [[Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Kansas-Nebraska Conference]], and was listed in the <em>[[Mennonite Yearbook and Directory|Mennonite Yearbook]] </em>1913-1918 with 18 members.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=|date=December 2011|a1_last=Unrau|a1_first=Harlan D|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=|date=December 2011|a1_last=Unrau|a1_first=Harlan D|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Latest revision as of 18:50, 20 August 2013

The Brandon Mennonite Church, sometimes referred to as a preaching point, was located in a small eastern Colorado farming community that had developed along the Missouri Pacific Railroad some 85 miles northeast of La Junta during the late 1880s. The congregation was formally established and received into the Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference in 1911. Jacob A. Heatwole, an ordained Virginia Mennonite Conference minister who had moved to Fairmount (present-day Swink), Colorado, in 1907, and would be ordained as a Bishop in the Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference at La Junta in 1919, served as a visiting minister to the small Brandon congregation during 1910-14. The congregation, which was listed in the Mennonite Yearbook 1913-18 with 18 members, remained under the pastoral care of the La Junta ministers during its brief tenure. By 1919 the congregation was no longer listed in the Mennonite Yearbook.

Contents

[edit] Bibliography

Unrau, Harlan D.  In Pursuit of Land, Health and Mission:  A History of Mennonites in the Mountain States Region.  Printed in Canada by Blitzprint Inc.  2007.

[edit] Additional Information

Original Article from Mennonite Encyclopedia

Vol. 1, p. 405 by Melvin Gingerich

Brandon, Colorado was a preaching point (Mennonite Church) under the Kansas-Nebraska Conference, and was listed in the Mennonite Yearbook 1913-1918 with 18 members.


Author(s) Harlan D Unrau
Date Published December 2011


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Unrau, Harlan D. "Brandon Mennonite Church (Brandon, Colorado, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. December 2011. Web. 29 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Brandon_Mennonite_Church_(Brandon,_Colorado,_USA)&oldid=75953.

APA style

Unrau, Harlan D. (December 2011). Brandon Mennonite Church (Brandon, Colorado, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 29 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Brandon_Mennonite_Church_(Brandon,_Colorado,_USA)&oldid=75953.




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