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[[File:OH_Butler.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Butler County, Ohio  
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[[File:OH_Butler.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Butler County, Ohio<br />
 
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Source: U.S. Census TIGER/Line map '']]
U.S. Census TIGER/Line map  
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Butler County, [[Ohio (USA)|Ohio]], a county in the extreme southwestern corner of the state, with Hamilton as the county seat. In this county was founded in 1819 the first of the Alsatian and South German [[Amish Mennonites|Amish]] settlements in North America, of the Amish migration to America following the European Napoleonic wars. Butler County became a brief stopping place for many of the Amish immigrants later moving on to [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]] and [[Iowa (USA)|Iowa]]. Among later Amish leaders who tarried here for a while were Christian Ropp, Peter Naffziger, [[Stuckey, Joseph (1825-1902)|Joseph Stuckey]], all later of Illinois; and [[Goldsmith, Joseph (1796-1876)|Joseph Goldschmidt]] of [[Iowa (USA)|Iowa]]. The present congregation, with a meetinghouse in the village of Trenton, is now called the [[Trenton Mennonite Church (Trenton, Ohio, USA)|Trenton Mennonite Church]] and is a member of Mennonite Church USA.
 
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'']]     Butler County, [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]], a county in the extreme southwestern corner of the state, with Hamilton as the county seat. In this county was founded in 1819 the first of the Alsatian and South German [[Amish|Amish]] settlements in North America, of the Amish migration to America following the European Napoleonic wars. Butler County became a brief stopping place for many of the Amish immigrants later moving on to [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]] and [[Iowa (USA)|Iowa]]. Among later Amish leaders who tarried here for a while were Christian Ropp, Peter Naffziger, [[Stuckey, Joseph (1825-1902)|Joseph Stuckey]], all later of Illinois; and [[Goldsmith, Joseph (1796-1876)|Joseph Goldschmidt]] of [[Iowa (USA)|Iowa]]. The present congregation, with a meetinghouse in the village of Trenton, is now called the [[Trenton Mennonite Church (Trenton, Ohio, USA)|Trenton Mennonite Church]] and is a member of Mennonite Church USA.
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{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 1, p. 486|date=1953|a1_last=Smith|a1_first=C. Henry|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 1, p. 486|date=1953|a1_last=Smith|a1_first=C. Henry|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Latest revision as of 03:27, 20 February 2014

Butler County, Ohio
Source: U.S. Census TIGER/Line map

Butler County, Ohio, a county in the extreme southwestern corner of the state, with Hamilton as the county seat. In this county was founded in 1819 the first of the Alsatian and South German Amish settlements in North America, of the Amish migration to America following the European Napoleonic wars. Butler County became a brief stopping place for many of the Amish immigrants later moving on to Illinois and Iowa. Among later Amish leaders who tarried here for a while were Christian Ropp, Peter Naffziger, Joseph Stuckey, all later of Illinois; and Joseph Goldschmidt of Iowa. The present congregation, with a meetinghouse in the village of Trenton, is now called the Trenton Mennonite Church and is a member of Mennonite Church USA.


Author(s) C. Henry Smith
Date Published 1953


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Smith, C. Henry. "Butler County (Ohio, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 31 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Butler_County_(Ohio,_USA)&oldid=113259.

APA style

Smith, C. Henry. (1953). Butler County (Ohio, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 31 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Butler_County_(Ohio,_USA)&oldid=113259.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 486. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.