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[[File:CateWolterten.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Wolter ten Cate
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[[File:CateWolterten.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Wolter ten Cate<br />
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Source: Doopsgezind Jaarboekje voor 1929, p. 97 '']]
  
Doopsgezind Jaarboekje
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Wolter ten Cate was born 28 August 1701 at [[Hengelo (Overijssel, Netherlands)|Hengelo]] in [[Twente (Overijssel, Netherlands)|Twente]], a district in the Dutch province of [[Overijssel (Netherlands)|Overijssel]]; he died at the same place, 8 August 1796. In 1720 he took over his father's textile factory, developed it into a flourishing industry, and consequently became wealthy. He was one of the founders of big industry in Twente. According to a tradition, he was taught the skill of damask manufacturing by weavers from Danzig. Wolter ten Cate, himself descended from a very old Mennonite family, was married in 1725 to Tjilke Jans Dijk, of a well-known Mennonite family in [[Groningen (Groningen, Netherlands)|Groningen]]. The marriage was childless. Ten Cate gave much of his time, devotion, and money to the church. In 1736 he was chosen minister of the [[Groningen Old Flemish Mennonites|Groninger Old Flemish]] congregation at [[Borne  (Overijssel, Netherlands)|Borne]], although he lived in Hengelo. This congregation he served until 1757, when he became minister of the congregation at Hengelo. In 1755 he was chosen overseer <em>(opziener) </em>of the Groninger Old Flemish congregation, a position which was similar to that of [[Elder (Ältester)|elder]] <em>(oudste). </em>Henceforth it was his task to visit the various congregations in the [[Netherlands|Netherlands]], a charge he performed with great zeal. In the congregation he was a person of great influence. Wolter-Oom (Uncle Wolter), as he was called, was a veritable patriarch among his own people. He exerted a marked influence on the confession of faith drawn up by the Groninger Old Flemish in 1755. His material bounty he shared liberally with his congregation; in 1791, toward the end of his life, he made it possible for his congregation at Hengelo to have a new church, but with the emphatic stipulation that above all it should be sober and simple in appearance.
 
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voor 1929, p. 97 '']]    Wolter ten Cate was born 28 August 1701 at [[Hengelo (Overijssel, Netherlands)|Hengelo]] in [[Twente (Overijssel, Netherlands)|Twente]], a district in the Dutch province of [[Overijssel (Netherlands)|Overijssel]]; he died at the same place, 8 August 1796. In 1720 he took over his father's textile factory, developed it into a flourishing industry, and consequently became wealthy. He was one of the founders of big industry in Twente. According to a tradition, he was taught the skill of damask manufacturing by weavers from Danzig. Wolter ten Cate, himself descended from a very old Mennonite family, was married in 1725 to Tjilke Jans Dijk, of a well-known Mennonite family in [[Groningen (Groningen, Netherlands)|Groningen]]. The marriage was childless. Ten Cate gave much of his time, devotion, and money to the church. In 1736 he was chosen minister of the [[Groningen Old Flemish Mennonites|Groninger Old Flemish]] congregation at [[Borne  (Overijssel, Netherlands)|Borne]], although he lived in Hengelo. This congregation he served until 1757, when he became minister of the congregation at Hengelo. In 1755 he was chosen overseer <em>(opziener) </em>of the Groninger Old Flemish congregation, a position which was similar to that of [[Elder (Ältester)|elder]] <em>(oudste). </em>Henceforth it was his task to visit the various congregations in the [[Netherlands|Netherlands]], a charge he performed with great zeal. In the congregation he was a person of great influence. Wolter-Oom (Uncle Wolter), as he was called, was a veritable patriarch among his own people. He exerted a marked influence on the confession of faith drawn up by the Groninger Old Flemish in 1755. His material bounty he shared liberally with his congregation; in 1791, toward the end of his life, he made it possible for his congregation at Hengelo to have a new church, but with the emphatic stipulation that above all it should be sober and simple in appearance.
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= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Uit het Verleden </em><em class="gameo_bibliography">der Dg. </em><em class="gameo_bibliography">in Twenthe. </em>Borne, n.d.: 117-118, 135-141.
 
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Uit het Verleden </em><em class="gameo_bibliography">der Dg. </em><em class="gameo_bibliography">in Twenthe. </em>Borne, n.d.: 117-118, 135-141.

Revision as of 07:12, 9 September 2013

Wolter ten Cate
Source: Doopsgezind Jaarboekje voor 1929, p. 97

Wolter ten Cate was born 28 August 1701 at Hengelo in Twente, a district in the Dutch province of Overijssel; he died at the same place, 8 August 1796. In 1720 he took over his father's textile factory, developed it into a flourishing industry, and consequently became wealthy. He was one of the founders of big industry in Twente. According to a tradition, he was taught the skill of damask manufacturing by weavers from Danzig. Wolter ten Cate, himself descended from a very old Mennonite family, was married in 1725 to Tjilke Jans Dijk, of a well-known Mennonite family in Groningen. The marriage was childless. Ten Cate gave much of his time, devotion, and money to the church. In 1736 he was chosen minister of the Groninger Old Flemish congregation at Borne, although he lived in Hengelo. This congregation he served until 1757, when he became minister of the congregation at Hengelo. In 1755 he was chosen overseer (opziener) of the Groninger Old Flemish congregation, a position which was similar to that of elder (oudste). Henceforth it was his task to visit the various congregations in the Netherlands, a charge he performed with great zeal. In the congregation he was a person of great influence. Wolter-Oom (Uncle Wolter), as he was called, was a veritable patriarch among his own people. He exerted a marked influence on the confession of faith drawn up by the Groninger Old Flemish in 1755. His material bounty he shared liberally with his congregation; in 1791, toward the end of his life, he made it possible for his congregation at Hengelo to have a new church, but with the emphatic stipulation that above all it should be sober and simple in appearance.

Bibliography

Uit het Verleden der Dg. in Twenthe. Borne, n.d.: 117-118, 135-141.

Rusburg, B. Iets over W. en J. ten Cate als oprigters der fabrijken . . . te Hengelo. N.p., n.d.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1953


Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Cate, Wolter ten (1701-1796)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 16 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Cate,_Wolter_ten_(1701-1796)&oldid=101387.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (1953). Cate, Wolter ten (1701-1796). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 16 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Cate,_Wolter_ten_(1701-1796)&oldid=101387.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 527. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.