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Central Mennonite Board of Home and Foreign Missions was incorporated in Illinois on 26 October 1909, four years after the Central Conference Mennonite Church first began to take an active interest in home and foreign mission work on an organized basis. The object for which it was formed as stated in the original articles of incorporation is as follows: "to systematize and extend the work of evangelization, to encourage, establish and support Home and Foreign Missions and Mission work, to receive and hold all donations and bequests, both personal and real estate, to be used only for missions purposes, and under the patronage and management of the Central Illinois Conference of Mennonites." The foreign mission work of the conference has been centered in the work in the Belgian Congo of Africa, and was a joint work with the Evangelical Mennonite Conference working together under the Congo Inland Mission Board. City missions were maintained in Chicago and Peoria, Illinois, but in line with the peculiar genius of the Mennonite people for work in rural areas, the two Chicago missions were closed and a conscious effort was made to reach and to expand in the rural areas of home mission work.


Author(s) L. E Troyer
Date Published 1953


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Troyer, L. E. "Central Mennonite Board of Home and Foreign Missions." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 1 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Central_Mennonite_Board_of_Home_and_Foreign_Missions&oldid=86614.

APA style

Troyer, L. E. (1953). Central Mennonite Board of Home and Foreign Missions. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 1 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Central_Mennonite_Board_of_Home_and_Foreign_Missions&oldid=86614.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 542. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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