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Central Mennonite Brethren Church (formerly known as Saskatoon Mennonite Brethren Church), located in [[Saskatoon (Saskatchewan, Canada)|Saskatoon]], [[Saskatchewan (Canada)|Saskatchewan]], began in 1927, when members gathered for worship under the leadership of Peter Funk. As more Mennonite Brethren moved into the city from rural [[Saskatchewan (Canada)|Saskatchewan]] a congregation was organized in 1932 under the leadership of Gerhard Penner, which met for services in a Baptist church. The first church was built on the corner of Avenue C and 25th Street West in 1935, and [[Rempel, Henry S. (1882-1979)|Henry S. Rempel]] became the leader of the city mission and also of the congregation. As the work grew the congregation was separated from the mission and a new church was built in 1954 on the corner of Avenue C and 33rd Street. This building was moved to 809 32nd Street West in 1966. An education wing as added at the same time. The language of worship was English; the transition from German occurred in the 1950s.
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Central Mennonite Brethren Church (formerly known as Saskatoon Mennonite Brethren Church), located in [[Saskatoon (Saskatchewan, Canada)|Saskatoon]], [[Saskatchewan (Canada)|Saskatchewan]], began in 1927, when members gathered for worship under the leadership of Peter Funk. As more Mennonite Brethren moved into the city from rural [[Saskatchewan (Canada)|Saskatchewan]] a congregation was organized in 1932 under the leadership of Gerhard Penner, which met for services in a Baptist church. The first church was built on the corner of Avenue C and 25th Street West in 1935, and [[Rempel, Henry S. (1882-1979)|Henry S. Rempel]] became the leader of the city mission and also of the congregation. As the work grew the congregation was separated from the mission and a new church was built in 1954 on the corner of Avenue C and 33rd Street. This building was moved to 809 32nd Street West in 1966. An education wing as added at the same time. The language of worship was English; the transition from German occurred in the 1950s.
 
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An aging membership and decreasing numbers led to the closing of the church in 1993. A new Mennonite Brethren church was founded in 1994 at the same location named Hope Fellowship Church. 
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An aging membership and decreasing numbers led to the closing of the church in 1993. A new Mennonite Brethren church was founded in 1994 at the same location named Hope Fellowship Church.
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonite Observer</em> (1 December 1959): 1.
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<em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonite Observer</em> (1 December 1959): 1.
  
 
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonite Brethren Herald </em>(27 August 1993): 17-19.
 
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonite Brethren Herald </em>(27 August 1993): 17-19.
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<h3>Archival Records</h3> Church records on microfilm at [http://www.mbconf.ca/mbstudies/index.en.html Centre for Mennonite Brethren Studies].
 
<h3>Archival Records</h3> Church records on microfilm at [http://www.mbconf.ca/mbstudies/index.en.html Centre for Mennonite Brethren Studies].
 
 
 
= Additional Information =
 
= Additional Information =
 
<strong>Denominational Affiliations:</strong>
 
<strong>Denominational Affiliations:</strong>

Revision as of 19:40, 20 August 2013

Central Mennonite Brethren Church (formerly known as Saskatoon Mennonite Brethren Church), located in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, began in 1927, when members gathered for worship under the leadership of Peter Funk. As more Mennonite Brethren moved into the city from rural Saskatchewan a congregation was organized in 1932 under the leadership of Gerhard Penner, which met for services in a Baptist church. The first church was built on the corner of Avenue C and 25th Street West in 1935, and Henry S. Rempel became the leader of the city mission and also of the congregation. As the work grew the congregation was separated from the mission and a new church was built in 1954 on the corner of Avenue C and 33rd Street. This building was moved to 809 32nd Street West in 1966. An education wing as added at the same time. The language of worship was English; the transition from German occurred in the 1950s.

An aging membership and decreasing numbers led to the closing of the church in 1993. A new Mennonite Brethren church was founded in 1994 at the same location named Hope Fellowship Church.

Contents

Bibliography

Mennonite Observer (1 December 1959): 1.

Mennonite Brethren Herald (27 August 1993): 17-19.

Penner, Peter. No Longer at Arm's Length: Mennonite Brethren Church Planting in Canada. 1987, 178 pp.

Toews, John A. A History of the Mennonite Brethren Church: Pilgrims and Pioneers. 1975: 163.

Archival Records

Church records on microfilm at Centre for Mennonite Brethren Studies.

Additional Information

Denominational Affiliations:

Saskatchewan Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches

Canadian Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches <br/>

General Conference of Mennonite Brethren Churches

Central MB Church Leading Ministers

Minister Years
G. H. Penner 1932-1934
Peter Funk 1934-1936
H. S. Rempel 1936-1944
Henry H. Epp 1946
P. J. Harder 1947-1949
Peter Funk 1949-1951
Art Martens 1952-1956
George L. Braun 1957-1962
Eugene Gerbrandt 1962-1968
Henry J. Harder 1968-1973
Reuben M. Baerg 1977-1983?
Harold Block 1985?-1988
Dallas Clausen 1988
Arnold Fehderau 1989-1993

Central MB Church Membership

Year Members
1957 302
1965 296
1985 209
1992 140


Author(s) J. H. Epp
Sam Steiner
Date Published October 2006


Cite This Article

MLA style

Epp, J. H. and Sam Steiner. "Central Mennonite Brethren Church (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. October 2006. Web. 20 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Central_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Saskatoon,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=86615.

APA style

Epp, J. H. and Sam Steiner. (October 2006). Central Mennonite Brethren Church (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Central_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Saskatoon,_Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=86615.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 427. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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