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The Centreville, Michigan, Old Order Amish Settlement in St. Joseph County, Michigan, was founded in 1910 by families from Allen and Adams counties. (Grabill, Berne) near Ft. Wayne, Indiana. Later, Amish from Lagrange County, Indiana, joined these early settlers, making this the largest and oldest of the 18 Amish settlements in Michigan. This community is unique in that the five congregations of approximately 800 people are a mixture of descendants of 18th-and 19th-century immigrants from Alsace and Switzerland. Although founded by the Swiss Amish, the community fellowships closely with the large Elkhart-Lagrange, Indiana, community, less than 20 mi. (30 km.) away, with frequent exchange of ministers and sometimes sharing the same bishop oversight. For 46 years, the Centreville settlement was the only Amish community in Michigan. From the mid-1950s to the mid-1980s, 17 new settlements developed in the state. Fourteen of these were single-congregation communities, and only time will tell whether or not these will survive.


Author(s) Samuel L Yoder
Date Published 1990


Cite This Article

MLA style

Yoder, Samuel L. "Centreville Old Order Amish Settlement (Centreville, Michigan, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1990. Web. 18 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Centreville_Old_Order_Amish_Settlement_(Centreville,_Michigan,_USA)&oldid=86623.

APA style

Yoder, Samuel L. (1990). Centreville Old Order Amish Settlement (Centreville, Michigan, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Centreville_Old_Order_Amish_Settlement_(Centreville,_Michigan,_USA)&oldid=86623.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 5, p.131. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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