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[[File:IL_Champaign_large.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Champaign County, Illinois  
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[[File:IL_Champaign_large.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Champaign County, Illinois
  
U.S. Census TIGER/Line map  
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U.S. Census TIGER/Line map '']]    Champaign County, [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], one of the largest counties in the state, lies 130 miles (205 km) directly south of [[Chicago (Illinois, USA)|Chicago]] in the fertile corn belt of the Midwest. With the exception of a few industries and the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana and a military base at Rantoul, in 1950 the county was devoted largely to agricultural pursuits.
 
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'']]    Champaign County, [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], one of the largest counties in the state, lies 130 miles (205 km) directly south of [[Chicago (Illinois, USA)|Chicago]] in the fertile corn belt of the Midwest. With the exception of a few industries and the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana and a military base at Rantoul, in 1950 the county was devoted largely to agricultural pursuits.
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A settlement of over 500 Mennonites ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church (MC)]]) was located in and near the northwest corner of the county near [[Fisher (Illinois, USA)|Fisher]] in the mid-1950s. The first Mennonite settlers arrived in this county around 1883 from [[Tazewell County (Illinois)|Tazewell County]], Illinois The greater part of the settlement is in the county, but about 100 members live in [[McLean County (Illinois, USA)|McLean County]] to the west and in Ford County to the north.
 
A settlement of over 500 Mennonites ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church (MC)]]) was located in and near the northwest corner of the county near [[Fisher (Illinois, USA)|Fisher]] in the mid-1950s. The first Mennonite settlers arrived in this county around 1883 from [[Tazewell County (Illinois)|Tazewell County]], Illinois The greater part of the settlement is in the county, but about 100 members live in [[McLean County (Illinois, USA)|McLean County]] to the west and in Ford County to the north.

Latest revision as of 13:57, 23 August 2013

Champaign County, Illinois U.S. Census TIGER/Line map
Champaign County, Illinois, one of the largest counties in the state, lies 130 miles (205 km) directly south of Chicago in the fertile corn belt of the Midwest. With the exception of a few industries and the University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana and a military base at Rantoul, in 1950 the county was devoted largely to agricultural pursuits.

A settlement of over 500 Mennonites (Mennonite Church (MC)) was located in and near the northwest corner of the county near Fisher in the mid-1950s. The first Mennonite settlers arrived in this county around 1883 from Tazewell County, Illinois The greater part of the settlement is in the county, but about 100 members live in McLean County to the west and in Ford County to the north.

The East Bend Church (Mennonite Church), the only Mennonite church in the county, is located in East Bend Township, two miles (three km) north and one mile (1.5 km) east of Fisher. The East Bend Church together with its mission station at Dewey serves all of the Mennonites in this settlement.


Author(s) Karl Massanari
Date Published 1953


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Massanari, Karl. "Champaign County (Illinois, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 26 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Champaign_County_(Illinois,_USA)&oldid=91375.

APA style

Massanari, Karl. (1953). Champaign County (Illinois, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Champaign_County_(Illinois,_USA)&oldid=91375.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 548. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.