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The Chipewyan Lakes congregation resulted from exploration of [[Voluntary Service|voluntary service]] (VS) opportunities in Northern [[Alberta (Canada)|Alberta]] by Ike and Millie Glick in 1959 on behalf of the [[Mennonite Board of Missions (Mennonite Church)|Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities]]. A small Native Canadian community remained at Chipewyan Lakes that still relied on fur trading for its well-being. Glick became an agent for a licensed fur trader at this remote community. Ike and Millie also encouraged Fred and Elsie Gingrich, who had been in [[Sandy Lake Mennonite Mission (Sandy Lake, Alberta, Canada)|Sandy Lake]], Alberta, to reopen a Hudson Bay Company store as well as a school in the community. In 1962 Mennonite VS workers began to serve as teachers in the school, beginning with Alvin Hershberger in 1962. The Gingrichs conducted Sunday school, and cooking and craft programs, but never started a formal church at Chipewyan Lakes. The occasional worship services were inter-denominational in nature. The participation of the Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities ended in the mid-1970s when VS programs contracted after the end of the [[Vietnam War (1954-75)|Vietnam War]]. Chipewyan Lakes was listed as related to the [[Northwest Mennonite Conference|Alberta-Saskatchewan Conference]] until about 1974.
 
The Chipewyan Lakes congregation resulted from exploration of [[Voluntary Service|voluntary service]] (VS) opportunities in Northern [[Alberta (Canada)|Alberta]] by Ike and Millie Glick in 1959 on behalf of the [[Mennonite Board of Missions (Mennonite Church)|Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities]]. A small Native Canadian community remained at Chipewyan Lakes that still relied on fur trading for its well-being. Glick became an agent for a licensed fur trader at this remote community. Ike and Millie also encouraged Fred and Elsie Gingrich, who had been in [[Sandy Lake Mennonite Mission (Sandy Lake, Alberta, Canada)|Sandy Lake]], Alberta, to reopen a Hudson Bay Company store as well as a school in the community. In 1962 Mennonite VS workers began to serve as teachers in the school, beginning with Alvin Hershberger in 1962. The Gingrichs conducted Sunday school, and cooking and craft programs, but never started a formal church at Chipewyan Lakes. The occasional worship services were inter-denominational in nature. The participation of the Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities ended in the mid-1970s when VS programs contracted after the end of the [[Vietnam War (1954-75)|Vietnam War]]. Chipewyan Lakes was listed as related to the [[Northwest Mennonite Conference|Alberta-Saskatchewan Conference]] until about 1974.
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Mennonite Historical Society of Canada database project (Letter with information sheet).
 
Mennonite Historical Society of Canada database project (Letter with information sheet).
  
 
Regehr, T. D. <em>Faith, Life and Witness in the Northwest, 1903-2003 : Centennial History of the Northwest Mennonite Conference</em>. Kitchener, Ont. : Pandora Press, 2003: 250-252.
 
Regehr, T. D. <em>Faith, Life and Witness in the Northwest, 1903-2003 : Centennial History of the Northwest Mennonite Conference</em>. Kitchener, Ont. : Pandora Press, 2003: 250-252.
 
 
  
 
= Maps =
 
= Maps =
 
[[Map:Chipewyan Lakes Mennonite Church (Chipewyan Lakes, Alberta)|Map:Chipewyan Lakes Mennonite Church (Chipewyan Lakes, Alberta)]]
 
[[Map:Chipewyan Lakes Mennonite Church (Chipewyan Lakes, Alberta)|Map:Chipewyan Lakes Mennonite Church (Chipewyan Lakes, Alberta)]]
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=|date=March 2010|a1_last=Epp|a1_first=Marlene|a2_last=Steiner|a2_first=Sam}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=|date=March 2010|a1_last=Epp|a1_first=Marlene|a2_last=Steiner|a2_first=Sam}}

Latest revision as of 19:40, 20 August 2013

The Chipewyan Lakes congregation resulted from exploration of voluntary service (VS) opportunities in Northern Alberta by Ike and Millie Glick in 1959 on behalf of the Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities. A small Native Canadian community remained at Chipewyan Lakes that still relied on fur trading for its well-being. Glick became an agent for a licensed fur trader at this remote community. Ike and Millie also encouraged Fred and Elsie Gingrich, who had been in Sandy Lake, Alberta, to reopen a Hudson Bay Company store as well as a school in the community. In 1962 Mennonite VS workers began to serve as teachers in the school, beginning with Alvin Hershberger in 1962. The Gingrichs conducted Sunday school, and cooking and craft programs, but never started a formal church at Chipewyan Lakes. The occasional worship services were inter-denominational in nature. The participation of the Mennonite Board of Missions and Charities ended in the mid-1970s when VS programs contracted after the end of the Vietnam War. Chipewyan Lakes was listed as related to the Alberta-Saskatchewan Conference until about 1974.

[edit] Bibliography

Mennonite Historical Society of Canada database project (Letter with information sheet).

Regehr, T. D. Faith, Life and Witness in the Northwest, 1903-2003 : Centennial History of the Northwest Mennonite Conference. Kitchener, Ont. : Pandora Press, 2003: 250-252.

[edit] Maps

Map:Chipewyan Lakes Mennonite Church (Chipewyan Lakes, Alberta)


Author(s) Marlene Epp
Sam Steiner
Date Published March 2010


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Epp, Marlene and Sam Steiner. "Chipewyan Lakes Mennonite Church (Chipewyan Lakes, Alberta, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. March 2010. Web. 27 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Chipewyan_Lakes_Mennonite_Church_(Chipewyan_Lakes,_Alberta,_Canada)&oldid=86693.

APA style

Epp, Marlene and Sam Steiner. (March 2010). Chipewyan Lakes Mennonite Church (Chipewyan Lakes, Alberta, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 27 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Chipewyan_Lakes_Mennonite_Church_(Chipewyan_Lakes,_Alberta,_Canada)&oldid=86693.




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