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Luray is the name generally applied to the Shenandoah National Park Civilian Public Service (CPS) Camp No. 45. It was operated by the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) under the National Park Service. Opened in August 1942, by December it had an enrolment of 152 men. The camp was located approximately 15 miles (25 km) southeast of the town of Luray, near the center of the Shenandoah National Park and a stone's throw west of the Skyline Drive. Among the jobs assigned to the men were the conducting of wild life surveys, blister rust control, construction of lookout towers, maintenance of the National Park headquarters, clearing the highways of snow, emergency farm work, and fire fighting. Two special schools, directed by the Mennonite Central Committee, were held at Camp No. 45, an arts and crafts school and a cooking school. The camp was closed in June 1946.

Bibliography

Gingerich, Melvin. Service for peace: a history of Mennonite Civilian Public Service. Akron, PA: Mennonite Central Committee, 1949: 150-157.


Author(s) Melvin Gingerich
Date Published 1958


Cite This Article

MLA style

Gingerich, Melvin. "Civilian Public Service Camp (Luray, Virginia, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1958. Web. 18 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Civilian_Public_Service_Camp_(Luray,_Virginia,_USA)&oldid=91458.

APA style

Gingerich, Melvin. (1958). Civilian Public Service Camp (Luray, Virginia, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Civilian_Public_Service_Camp_(Luray,_Virginia,_USA)&oldid=91458.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 415. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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