From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search
[unchecked revision][checked revision]
(CSV import - 20130816)
 
(CSV import - 20130820)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
The Clearfork Amish Mennonite Church ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]), now extinct, was organized in [[Cass County (Missouri, USA)|Cass County]], [[Missouri (USA)|Missouri]], in 1868, by settlers who had come from [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]], [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], [[Michigan (State)|Michigan]], and [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]]. After worshiping in their homes for several years, they built the Clearfork Church in 1870. In the winter of 1875-1876, a church split divided the congregation into two factions, the more liberal, known as the "Eicher people," finally obtaining control of the church building. The conservative group then built the [[Sycamore Grove Mennonite Church (Garden City, Missouri, USA)|Sycamore Grove Church]]. The Eicher group (see [[Eicher, Benjamin (1832-1893)|Benjamin Eicher]]) finally disbanded, although from among their members, through the preaching of [[Coffman, John S. (1848-1899)|John S. Coffman]], were recruited a nucleus who established the [[Bethel Mennonite Church (Garden City, Missouri, USA)|Bethel Mennonite Church]][[Bethel Mennonite Church (Garden City, Missouri, USA)|.]]
 
The Clearfork Amish Mennonite Church ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]), now extinct, was organized in [[Cass County (Missouri, USA)|Cass County]], [[Missouri (USA)|Missouri]], in 1868, by settlers who had come from [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]], [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], [[Michigan (State)|Michigan]], and [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]]. After worshiping in their homes for several years, they built the Clearfork Church in 1870. In the winter of 1875-1876, a church split divided the congregation into two factions, the more liberal, known as the "Eicher people," finally obtaining control of the church building. The conservative group then built the [[Sycamore Grove Mennonite Church (Garden City, Missouri, USA)|Sycamore Grove Church]]. The Eicher group (see [[Eicher, Benjamin (1832-1893)|Benjamin Eicher]]) finally disbanded, although from among their members, through the preaching of [[Coffman, John S. (1848-1899)|John S. Coffman]], were recruited a nucleus who established the [[Bethel Mennonite Church (Garden City, Missouri, USA)|Bethel Mennonite Church]][[Bethel Mennonite Church (Garden City, Missouri, USA)|.]]
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 1, p. 620|date=1953|a1_last=Gingerich|a1_first=Melvin|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 1, p. 620|date=1953|a1_last=Gingerich|a1_first=Melvin|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Revision as of 19:08, 20 August 2013

The Clearfork Amish Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church), now extinct, was organized in Cass County, Missouri, in 1868, by settlers who had come from Ohio, Illinois, Michigan, and Pennsylvania. After worshiping in their homes for several years, they built the Clearfork Church in 1870. In the winter of 1875-1876, a church split divided the congregation into two factions, the more liberal, known as the "Eicher people," finally obtaining control of the church building. The conservative group then built the Sycamore Grove Church. The Eicher group (see Benjamin Eicher) finally disbanded, although from among their members, through the preaching of John S. Coffman, were recruited a nucleus who established the Bethel Mennonite Church.


Author(s) Melvin Gingerich
Date Published 1953


Cite This Article

MLA style

Gingerich, Melvin. "Clearfork Amish Mennonite Church (Cass County, Missouri, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 11 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Clearfork_Amish_Mennonite_Church_(Cass_County,_Missouri,_USA)&oldid=79728.

APA style

Gingerich, Melvin. (1953). Clearfork Amish Mennonite Church (Cass County, Missouri, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 11 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Clearfork_Amish_Mennonite_Church_(Cass_County,_Missouri,_USA)&oldid=79728.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 620. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.