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<em>Doopsgezinde Bundel</em> is<strong> </strong>a Dutch Mennonite hymnbook. From the middle of the 16th century until 1940 a large number of Dutch Mennonite hymnbooks were published (see [[Hymnology of the Mennonites in the Netherlands|Hymnology]]). In 1900 there were still 15 or 16 different hymnals in use in the Dutch congregations, most of them using two to five different books; in 1940, 13 different editions were still being used, though the <em>Leidse Bündel</em><em> </em>and the two <em>Protestantenbondbundels </em>predominated. For many years it had been felt desirable to have a single songbook for the entire Dutch Mennonite brotherhood. In 1936 the church boards of the [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]] and Haarlem congregations cooperated with the <em>Vereniging voor Gemeentedagen, </em>which was also planning to compile a new hymnal for their [[Elspeet (Gelderland, Netherlands)|Elspeet]] and other conferences. In 1937 the<strong> </strong>[[Nederlandse Protestantenbond|&lt;em&gt;Nederlandsche Protestanten-Bond&lt;/em&gt;]]<em> </em>also appointed a committee to make a new hymnal, and this committee then joined the two Mennonite groups in composing a hymnbook for the use of all the groups. This book was ready in 1943, but was not used in the congregations until 1945. The book contained 250 hymns. Special attention was given to restoring the music for the hymns to its original form by removing extraneous additions.
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<em>Doopsgezinde Bundel</em> is<strong> </strong>a Dutch Mennonite hymnbook. From the middle of the 16th century until 1940 a large number of Dutch Mennonite hymnbooks were published (see [[Hymnology of the Mennonites in the Netherlands|Hymnology]]). In 1900 there were still 15 or 16 different hymnals in use in the Dutch congregations, most of them using two to five different books; in 1940, 13 different editions were still being used, though the <em>Leidse Bündel</em><em> </em>and the two <em>Protestantenbondbundels </em>predominated. For many years it had been felt desirable to have a single songbook for the entire Dutch Mennonite brotherhood. In 1936 the church boards of the [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]] and Haarlem congregations cooperated with the <em>Vereniging voor Gemeentedagen, </em>which was also planning to compile a new hymnal for their [[Elspeet (Gelderland, Netherlands)|Elspeet]] and other conferences. In 1937 the<strong> </strong>[[Nederlandse Protestantenbond|<em>Nederlandsche Protestanten-Bond</em>]]<em> </em>also appointed a committee to make a new hymnal, and this committee then joined the two Mennonite groups in composing a hymnbook for the use of all the groups. This book was ready in 1943, but was not used in the congregations until 1945. The book contained 250 hymns. Special attention was given to restoring the music for the hymns to its original form by removing extraneous additions.
  
 
This hymnal was used by a large number of Dutch Protestant churches, Mennonites, [[Remonstrants|Remonstrants]], Lutherans, <em>Vrije Gemeente </em>(Free Church of Amsterdam), and <em>Vrijzinnig Hervormden </em>(Liberal Reformed churches), besides the departments of the <em>Nederlandsche Protestanten-Bond.</em>
 
This hymnal was used by a large number of Dutch Protestant churches, Mennonites, [[Remonstrants|Remonstrants]], Lutherans, <em>Vrije Gemeente </em>(Free Church of Amsterdam), and <em>Vrijzinnig Hervormden </em>(Liberal Reformed churches), besides the departments of the <em>Nederlandsche Protestanten-Bond.</em>
  
For many Mennonites, however, the book in this form was not quite satisfactory. For this reason 50 favorite hymns from former Mennonite songbooks were inserted. Some hymns suited to particular Mennonite services like baptism were also given place. So the <em>Doopsgezinde Bundel, </em>edited by the [[Algemene Doopsgezinde Societeit|Algemene Doopsgezinde Sociëteit]]<em> </em>(preface of 1944), consists of 300 hymns. It is now in use in nearly all Mennonite churches of the [[Netherlands|Netherlands]], the old hymnbooks all having been abandoned. Only the congregations of [[Ameland (Friesland, Netherlands)|Ameland]], [[Blokzijl (Overijssel, Netherlands)|Blokzijl]], and [[Ouddorp (Zuid-Holland, Netherlands)|Ouddorp]]did not adopt the <em>Doopsgezinde Bundel, </em>but retained the old Reformed songbooks.
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For many Mennonites, however, the book in this form was not quite satisfactory. For this reason 50 favorite hymns from former Mennonite songbooks were inserted. Some hymns suited to particular Mennonite services like baptism were also given place. So the <em>Doopsgezinde Bundel, </em>edited by the [[Algemene Doopsgezinde Societeit|Algemene Doopsgezinde Sociëteit]]<em> </em>(preface of 1944), consists of 300 hymns. It is now in use in nearly all Mennonite churches of the [[Netherlands|Netherlands]], the old hymnbooks all having been abandoned. Only the congregations of [[Ameland (Friesland, Netherlands)|Ameland]], [[Blokzijl (Overijssel, Netherlands)|Blokzijl]], and [[Ouddorp (Zuid-Holland, Netherlands)|Ouddorp ]]did not adopt the <em>Doopsgezinde Bundel, </em>but retained the old Reformed songbooks.
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 87|date=1956|a1_last=van der Zijpp|a1_first=Nanne|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 87|date=1956|a1_last=van der Zijpp|a1_first=Nanne|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Revision as of 14:30, 23 August 2013

Doopsgezinde Bundel is a Dutch Mennonite hymnbook. From the middle of the 16th century until 1940 a large number of Dutch Mennonite hymnbooks were published (see Hymnology). In 1900 there were still 15 or 16 different hymnals in use in the Dutch congregations, most of them using two to five different books; in 1940, 13 different editions were still being used, though the Leidse Bündel and the two Protestantenbondbundels predominated. For many years it had been felt desirable to have a single songbook for the entire Dutch Mennonite brotherhood. In 1936 the church boards of the Amsterdam and Haarlem congregations cooperated with the Vereniging voor Gemeentedagen, which was also planning to compile a new hymnal for their Elspeet and other conferences. In 1937 the Nederlandsche Protestanten-Bond also appointed a committee to make a new hymnal, and this committee then joined the two Mennonite groups in composing a hymnbook for the use of all the groups. This book was ready in 1943, but was not used in the congregations until 1945. The book contained 250 hymns. Special attention was given to restoring the music for the hymns to its original form by removing extraneous additions.

This hymnal was used by a large number of Dutch Protestant churches, Mennonites, Remonstrants, Lutherans, Vrije Gemeente (Free Church of Amsterdam), and Vrijzinnig Hervormden (Liberal Reformed churches), besides the departments of the Nederlandsche Protestanten-Bond.

For many Mennonites, however, the book in this form was not quite satisfactory. For this reason 50 favorite hymns from former Mennonite songbooks were inserted. Some hymns suited to particular Mennonite services like baptism were also given place. So the Doopsgezinde Bundel, edited by the Algemene Doopsgezinde Sociëteit (preface of 1944), consists of 300 hymns. It is now in use in nearly all Mennonite churches of the Netherlands, the old hymnbooks all having been abandoned. Only the congregations of Ameland, Blokzijl, and Ouddorp did not adopt the Doopsgezinde Bundel, but retained the old Reformed songbooks.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Doopsgezinde Bundel." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 24 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Doopsgezinde_Bundel&oldid=94411.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (1956). Doopsgezinde Bundel. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 24 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Doopsgezinde_Bundel&oldid=94411.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 87. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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