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The Ebenezer [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]] Church, now extinct, located four miles (6.5 km) east of [[Buhler (Kansas, USA)|Buhler]], Reno County, [[Kansas (USA)|Kansas]], had its beginning in 1878, when a number of families from [[Russia|Russia]] settled in the community, with Franz Ediger and Peter Wall as leaders. In 1879 [[Schellenberg, Abraham (1845-1920)|Elder Abraham Schellenberg]] organized this group as a church; he served as elder until 1906. Their first building, erected in 1880, was of earthen brick, 30 x 50 feet, and was replaced by a frame church in 1900. Other ministers who have served this congregation are Elder Henry Adrian, Franz Ediger, Peter Wall, and Gerhard Franz. In 1921 this congregation united as a body with the [[Buhler Mennonite Brethren Church (Buhler, Kansas, USA)|Mennonite Brethren Church of Buhler]], after having been the mother church of other congregations in Reno, [[McPherson County (Kansas, USA)|McPherson]], and Harvey counties in Kansas.
 
The Ebenezer [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]] Church, now extinct, located four miles (6.5 km) east of [[Buhler (Kansas, USA)|Buhler]], Reno County, [[Kansas (USA)|Kansas]], had its beginning in 1878, when a number of families from [[Russia|Russia]] settled in the community, with Franz Ediger and Peter Wall as leaders. In 1879 [[Schellenberg, Abraham (1845-1920)|Elder Abraham Schellenberg]] organized this group as a church; he served as elder until 1906. Their first building, erected in 1880, was of earthen brick, 30 x 50 feet, and was replaced by a frame church in 1900. Other ministers who have served this congregation are Elder Henry Adrian, Franz Ediger, Peter Wall, and Gerhard Franz. In 1921 this congregation united as a body with the [[Buhler Mennonite Brethren Church (Buhler, Kansas, USA)|Mennonite Brethren Church of Buhler]], after having been the mother church of other congregations in Reno, [[McPherson County (Kansas, USA)|McPherson]], and Harvey counties in Kansas.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 136|date=1956|a1_last=Toews|a1_first=Jacob J|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 136|date=1956|a1_last=Toews|a1_first=Jacob J|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Latest revision as of 19:43, 20 August 2013

The Ebenezer Mennonite Brethren Church, now extinct, located four miles (6.5 km) east of Buhler, Reno County, Kansas, had its beginning in 1878, when a number of families from Russia settled in the community, with Franz Ediger and Peter Wall as leaders. In 1879 Elder Abraham Schellenberg organized this group as a church; he served as elder until 1906. Their first building, erected in 1880, was of earthen brick, 30 x 50 feet, and was replaced by a frame church in 1900. Other ministers who have served this congregation are Elder Henry Adrian, Franz Ediger, Peter Wall, and Gerhard Franz. In 1921 this congregation united as a body with the Mennonite Brethren Church of Buhler, after having been the mother church of other congregations in Reno, McPherson, and Harvey counties in Kansas.


Author(s) Jacob J Toews
Date Published 1956


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Toews, Jacob J. "Ebenezer Mennonite Brethren Church (Reno County, Kansas, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 20 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Ebenezer_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Reno_County,_Kansas,_USA)&oldid=87176.

APA style

Toews, Jacob J. (1956). Ebenezer Mennonite Brethren Church (Reno County, Kansas, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Ebenezer_Mennonite_Brethren_Church_(Reno_County,_Kansas,_USA)&oldid=87176.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 136. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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