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Emmanuel Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), located 13 miles south and one mile west of Doland, Spink County, South Dakota, originally a member of the Northern District Conference, General Conference Mennonite Church (GCM), was organized in 1921 with 36 members under the leadership of J. W. Kleinsasser, the first pastor. The 1953 membership was 89, and all were rural people. The original frame meetinghouse, erected in 1922 and seating 180, was still in use in 1954. Ministers who have served the congregation are J. W. Kleinsasser, Jacob A. Friesen, missionary Elmer Dick, who served two months as interim pastor, Frank Loewen, Lyman W. Sprunger, and Paul Quenzer.

The congregation is presently a member of the Central Plains Mennonite Conference, part of Mennonite Church USA. In 2008 the membership was 117; the pastor was Gordon Wayne Wiebe.

Additional Information

Address: 18507 405th Avenue, Doland, South Dakota

Phone: 605-266-2588

Website: Emmanuel Mennonite Church

Denominational Affiliations:

Central Plains Mennonite Conference

Mennonite Church USA


Author(s) Lyman W Sprunger
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Sprunger, Lyman W. "Emmanuel Mennonite Church (Doland, South Dakota, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 28 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Emmanuel_Mennonite_Church_(Doland,_South_Dakota,_USA)&oldid=80471.

APA style

Sprunger, Lyman W. (1956). Emmanuel Mennonite Church (Doland, South Dakota, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 28 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Emmanuel_Mennonite_Church_(Doland,_South_Dakota,_USA)&oldid=80471.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 204. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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