From GAMEO
Revision as of 19:12, 20 August 2013 by GameoAdmin (Talk | contribs)

(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)

Jump to: navigation, search

Jakob Enns, born 31 October 1768, died 23 April 1818, was the first elder of the Flemish congregation in the Molotschna settlement, South Russia. He was probably one of the small group of immigrants from Neuenhuben near Danzig who settled in Russia on 23 August 1804. He had been made preacher in Prussia, and was ordained an elder in Russia in 1805 and served as such until 1818. P. M. Friesen describes him as a man of great zeal but without spiritual life. As a result of his violent character serious strife arose concerning civil punishment and inadequate church discipline, which finally led to division and the organization of the Kleine Gemeinde.

Bibliography

Friesen, Peter M. The Mennonite Brotherhood in Russia (1789-1910), trans. J. B. Toews and others. Fresno, CA: Board of Christian Literature [M.B.], 1978, rev. ed. 1980: 74 f., 106 ff.

GRANDMA (The Genealogical Registry and Database of Mennonite Ancestry) Database, 5.05 ed. Fresno, CA: California Mennonite Historical Society, 2008: #44833.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I, 593.


Author(s) Abraham Braun
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Braun, Abraham. "Enns, Jakob (1768-1818)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 2 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Enns,_Jakob_(1768-1818)&oldid=80510.

APA style

Braun, Abraham. (1956). Enns, Jakob (1768-1818). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 2 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Enns,_Jakob_(1768-1818)&oldid=80510.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 225. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.