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The little that is known of this martyr is found in the [[Hutterite Chronicles|Hutterite chronicles]] and a few documents in the archives of [[Tyrol (Austria)|Tyrol]]. He was a native of Pinnegg, and in the days when the Tyrolese authorities were searching for [[Hutter, Jakob (d. 1536)|Jakob Hutter]] with all the means at their disposal, Fest was trying to win converts in the mines around [[Schwaz (Tyrol, Austria)|Schwaz]] in the [[Inn Valley (Austria)|Inn Valley]]. Here he was captured and taken to Schwaz. Several attempts were made to convert him to the Catholic Church, and because he was adamant he was sentenced to death and beheaded 3 July 1533. In prison he wrote a letter (still extant) to the church at [[Rattenberg (Tyrol, Austria)|Rattenberg]] on the Inn, [[Austria|Austria]], which admonishes "that we should not be selfish, for greed is the root and the origin of evil," and which names several persons who are better known in the annals of the suffering of the Brethren; since he names Marpeck's wife, it is likely that he belonged to the circle of [[Marpeck, Pilgram (d. 1556)|Pilgram Marpeck]].
 
The little that is known of this martyr is found in the [[Hutterite Chronicles|Hutterite chronicles]] and a few documents in the archives of [[Tyrol (Austria)|Tyrol]]. He was a native of Pinnegg, and in the days when the Tyrolese authorities were searching for [[Hutter, Jakob (d. 1536)|Jakob Hutter]] with all the means at their disposal, Fest was trying to win converts in the mines around [[Schwaz (Tyrol, Austria)|Schwaz]] in the [[Inn Valley (Austria)|Inn Valley]]. Here he was captured and taken to Schwaz. Several attempts were made to convert him to the Catholic Church, and because he was adamant he was sentenced to death and beheaded 3 July 1533. In prison he wrote a letter (still extant) to the church at [[Rattenberg (Tyrol, Austria)|Rattenberg]] on the Inn, [[Austria|Austria]], which admonishes "that we should not be selfish, for greed is the root and the origin of evil," and which names several persons who are better known in the annals of the suffering of the Brethren; since he names Marpeck's wife, it is likely that he belonged to the circle of [[Marpeck, Pilgram (d. 1556)|Pilgram Marpeck]].
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Beck Josef. <em>Die Geschichts-Bücher der Wiedertäufer in Oesterreich-Ungarn</em>. Vienna, 1883: 107.
 
Beck Josef. <em>Die Geschichts-Bücher der Wiedertäufer in Oesterreich-Ungarn</em>. Vienna, 1883: 107.
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Zieglschmid, A.J.F.  <em>Die älteste Chronik der Hutterischen Brüder: Ein Sprachdenkmal aus frühneuhochdeutscher Zeit</em>. Ithaca: Cayuga Press, 1943: 104.
 
Zieglschmid, A.J.F.  <em>Die älteste Chronik der Hutterischen Brüder: Ein Sprachdenkmal aus frühneuhochdeutscher Zeit</em>. Ithaca: Cayuga Press, 1943: 104.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 327|date=1956|a1_last=Loserth|a1_first=Johann|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 327|date=1956|a1_last=Loserth|a1_first=Johann|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Revision as of 19:13, 20 August 2013

The little that is known of this martyr is found in the Hutterite chronicles and a few documents in the archives of Tyrol. He was a native of Pinnegg, and in the days when the Tyrolese authorities were searching for Jakob Hutter with all the means at their disposal, Fest was trying to win converts in the mines around Schwaz in the Inn Valley. Here he was captured and taken to Schwaz. Several attempts were made to convert him to the Catholic Church, and because he was adamant he was sentenced to death and beheaded 3 July 1533. In prison he wrote a letter (still extant) to the church at Rattenberg on the Inn, Austria, which admonishes "that we should not be selfish, for greed is the root and the origin of evil," and which names several persons who are better known in the annals of the suffering of the Brethren; since he names Marpeck's wife, it is likely that he belonged to the circle of Pilgram Marpeck.

Bibliography

Beck Josef. Die Geschichts-Bücher der Wiedertäufer in Oesterreich-Ungarn. Vienna, 1883: 107.

Braght, Thieleman J. van. Het Bloedigh Tooneel of Martelaers Spiegel der Doopsgesinde of Weereloose Christenen, Die om ‘t getuygenis van Jesus haren Salighmaker geleden hebben ende gedood zijn van Christi tijd of tot desen tijd toe. Den Tweeden Druk. Amsterdam: Hieronymus Sweerts, …, 1685: Part II, 34.

Braght, Thieleman J. van. The Bloody Theatre or Martyrs’ Mirror of the Defenseless Christians Who Baptized Only upon Confession of Faith and Who Suffered and Died for the Testimony of Jesus Their Saviour… to the Year A.D. 1660. Scottdale, PA: Herald Press, 1951: 441. Available online at: http://www.homecomers.org/mirror/index.htm.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I. 642.

Loserth, Johann. Der Anabaptismus in Tirol. Vienna: F. Tempsky, 1892: 83.

Mennonite Quarterly Review 15 (1941): 23-25.

Zieglschmid, A.J.F.  Die älteste Chronik der Hutterischen Brüder: Ein Sprachdenkmal aus frühneuhochdeutscher Zeit. Ithaca: Cayuga Press, 1943: 104.


Author(s) Johann Loserth
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Loserth, Johann. "Fest, Ludwig (d. 1533)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 22 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Fest,_Ludwig_(d._1533)&oldid=80783.

APA style

Loserth, Johann. (1956). Fest, Ludwig (d. 1533). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 22 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Fest,_Ludwig_(d._1533)&oldid=80783.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 327. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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