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Jakob Galle (1732-1801) of [[Uffhofen (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Uffhofen]], [[Germany|Germany]], was a preacher of the Mennonite congregation at [[Erbesbüdesheim (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Erbesbüdesheim]] 1762, elder 1767, who dedicated the new church at Sembach, 1 January 1778 (Brons, 216). He did much to sustain and revive his congregation. His son Johannes (1766-1838), "a man of zeal for the customs and discipline of the fathers" <em>(Mennonitische Blätter</em>), was preacher of the congregation of [[Ober-Flörsheim (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Oberflörsheim]]<em>. </em>He also served many years as elder of the church at [[Weierhof (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Weierhof]], but separated from it and the other large congregations in Hesse and the [[Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Palatinate]] when they began to engage educated ministers for a salary. He also opposed the introduction of the new hymnal and catechism. He apparently clung to the old[[Ausbund|&lt;em&gt; Ausbund&lt;/em&gt;]], for in his letters he frequently lamented that the martyrs' hymns were being abandoned. [[Braght, Tieleman Jansz van (1625-1664)|Van Braght's]][[Martyrs' Mirror|&lt;em&gt;Martyrs' Mirror &lt;/em&gt;]]he valued very highly. He must have been a gifted speaker. His extensive correspondence with brethren in North America, Switzerland, [[Bayern Federal State (Germany)|Bavaria]], and [[Alsace (France)|Alsace]] reveals an unusual knowledge of the Bible. His most faithful adherents he found in [[Heppenheim auf der Wiese (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Heppenheim an der Wiese]], Oberflörsheim, Uffhofen, [[Kühbörncheshof Mennonite Church (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Kühbörncheshof]], and [[Neudorferhof (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Neudorferhof]]. These five congregations formed a close union under his leadership, published the [[Deknatel, Jeme (Joannes) (1698-1759)|Deknatel]] catechism and the 35 questions and answers by Gerrit Roosen anew, held their own meetings, and energetically resisted all innovations (mixed marriages, foreign mission, etc.). After the death of Galle this division among the Palatine-Hessian congregations gradually disappeared.
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Jakob Galle (1732-1801) of [[Uffhofen (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Uffhofen]], [[Germany|Germany]], was a preacher of the Mennonite congregation at [[Erbesbüdesheim (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Erbesbüdesheim]] 1762, elder 1767, who dedicated the new church at Sembach, 1 January 1778 (Brons, 216). He did much to sustain and revive his congregation. His son Johannes (1766-1838), "a man of zeal for the customs and discipline of the fathers" <em>(Mennonitische Blätter</em>), was preacher of the congregation of [[Ober-Flörsheim (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Oberflörsheim]]<em>. </em>He also served many years as elder of the church at [[Weierhof (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Weierhof]], but separated from it and the other large congregations in Hesse and the [[Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Palatinate]] when they began to engage educated ministers for a salary. He also opposed the introduction of the new hymnal and catechism. He apparently clung to the old[[Ausbund|<em> Ausbund</em>]], for in his letters he frequently lamented that the martyrs' hymns were being abandoned. [[Braght, Tieleman Jansz van (1625-1664)|Van Braght's ]][[Martyrs' Mirror|<em>Martyrs' Mirror </em>]]he valued very highly. He must have been a gifted speaker. His extensive correspondence with brethren in North America, Switzerland, [[Bayern Federal State (Germany)|Bavaria]], and [[Alsace (France)|Alsace]] reveals an unusual knowledge of the Bible. His most faithful adherents he found in [[Heppenheim auf der Wiese (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Heppenheim an der Wiese]], Oberflörsheim, Uffhofen, [[Kühbörncheshof Mennonite Church (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Kühbörncheshof]], and [[Neudorferhof (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Neudorferhof]]. These five congregations formed a close union under his leadership, published the [[Deknatel, Jeme (Joannes) (1698-1759)|Deknatel]] catechism and the 35 questions and answers by Gerrit Roosen anew, held their own meetings, and energetically resisted all innovations (mixed marriages, foreign mission, etc.). After the death of Galle this division among the Palatine-Hessian congregations gradually disappeared.
 
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= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Brons, Anna. <em class="gameo_bibliography">Ursprung, Entwickelung und Schicksale der altevangelischen Taufgesinnten oder Mennoniten: in kurzen Zügen übersichtlich dargestellt.</em> Amsterdam: Johannes Müller, 1912.
 
Brons, Anna. <em class="gameo_bibliography">Ursprung, Entwickelung und Schicksale der altevangelischen Taufgesinnten oder Mennoniten: in kurzen Zügen übersichtlich dargestellt.</em> Amsterdam: Johannes Müller, 1912.
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<em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonitische Blätter </em>(1855): 52.
 
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonitische Blätter </em>(1855): 52.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 437|date=1956|a1_last=Neff|a1_first=Christian|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 437|date=1956|a1_last=Neff|a1_first=Christian|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Revision as of 14:02, 23 August 2013

Jakob Galle (1732-1801) of Uffhofen, Germany, was a preacher of the Mennonite congregation at Erbesbüdesheim 1762, elder 1767, who dedicated the new church at Sembach, 1 January 1778 (Brons, 216). He did much to sustain and revive his congregation. His son Johannes (1766-1838), "a man of zeal for the customs and discipline of the fathers" (Mennonitische Blätter), was preacher of the congregation of Oberflörsheim. He also served many years as elder of the church at Weierhof, but separated from it and the other large congregations in Hesse and the Palatinate when they began to engage educated ministers for a salary. He also opposed the introduction of the new hymnal and catechism. He apparently clung to the old Ausbund, for in his letters he frequently lamented that the martyrs' hymns were being abandoned. Van Braght's Martyrs' Mirror he valued very highly. He must have been a gifted speaker. His extensive correspondence with brethren in North America, Switzerland, Bavaria, and Alsace reveals an unusual knowledge of the Bible. His most faithful adherents he found in Heppenheim an der Wiese, Oberflörsheim, Uffhofen, Kühbörncheshof, and Neudorferhof. These five congregations formed a close union under his leadership, published the Deknatel catechism and the 35 questions and answers by Gerrit Roosen anew, held their own meetings, and energetically resisted all innovations (mixed marriages, foreign mission, etc.). After the death of Galle this division among the Palatine-Hessian congregations gradually disappeared.

Bibliography

Brons, Anna. Ursprung, Entwickelung und Schicksale der altevangelischen Taufgesinnten oder Mennoniten: in kurzen Zügen übersichtlich dargestellt. Amsterdam: Johannes Müller, 1912.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: II, 30.

Mennonitische Blätter (1855): 52.


Author(s) Christian Neff
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian. "Galle, Jakob (1732-1801)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 30 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Galle,_Jakob_(1732-1801)&oldid=91843.

APA style

Neff, Christian. (1956). Galle, Jakob (1732-1801). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 30 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Galle,_Jakob_(1732-1801)&oldid=91843.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 437. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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