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Gehman Mennonite Church, 146.
Scan courtesy Mennonite Church USA Archives-Goshen X-31.1, Box 18/25

The Gehman Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), located on Witmer Road, Adamstown, Brecknock Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, is a member of the Lancaster Mennonite Conference. The first Mennonites to settle here were a group of Swiss, who came in 1754-1758, among them Niklaus Schantz, Hans Schantz, Joseph Wenger, Jost Schoenauer, Hans Burchalter, Hans Moser, and Christian Gehman. The congregation was probably organized in 1760. It worshiped in private homes until 1846, when the first meetinghouse was built, which was replaced in 1913 by a larger frame meetinghouse. Christian Bauman (1724-1790) was the first minister, Joseph Wenger first deacon. Daniel Gehman was an outstanding man in this congregation (1774 ordained deacon, 1792 ordained minister, d. 1809). From 1774 to the mid-20th centuery there was a Gehman as minister or deacon in this congregation. In 1955 the membership of the congregation was 90, with Paul Z. Martin and Benjamin S. Zeiset as ministers.


Author(s) Aaron M Weber
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Weber, Aaron M. "Gehman Mennonite Church (Adamstown, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 20 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gehman_Mennonite_Church_(Adamstown,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=104767.

APA style

Weber, Aaron M. (1956). Gehman Mennonite Church (Adamstown, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gehman_Mennonite_Church_(Adamstown,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=104767.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 445. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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