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Max Goebel was a German church historian, b. 13 March 1811 at Solingen, d. 13 December 1857 at Coblenz. He studied theology at the University of Bonn, served as pastor in Siegburg and Coblenz, where he made friendly contacts with J. G. Lübke at [[Neuwied (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Neuwied]] and [[Molenaar, Johannes (1810-1868)|Johannes Molenaar]] at [[Monsheim (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Monsheim]], who later became Mennonite preachers. He is the author of the important book, <em>Geschichte des christlichen Lebens in der rheinisch-westfälischen evangelischen Kirche</em> (Vol. I, 1849; Vol. II, 1852; Vol. III edited by Th. Link in 1860 from papers left by Goebel). In this work the Mennonites, especially those of the Rhineland, are given extensive, sympathetic treatment; much new material is presented, making the book an important source for the study of Mennonite history in the Rhineland. Never before had the [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]] movement received so thorough a presentation, based on study of the sources, or so just a characterization of its nature (see the excellent analysis of Anabaptism, Vol. I, 134-39, which is still of great value). Of especial interest is the attempt of the author to prove that [[Pietism|Pietism]] in the Rhineland can be traced back to the Anabaptist movement of the 16th century. The <em>Monatsschrift für die evangelische Kirche der Rheinprovinz</em>, which Max Goebel edited with C. F. Kling, contains an interesting article from his pen in 4 November 1848, pp. 228-40, "Die oberländischen Mennoniten" (erroneously called [[Hutterian Brethren (Hutterische Brüder)|Hutterites]]). They are [[Amish Mennonites|Amish Mennonites]], whom the author describes at first hand. Though some of the material is incorrect and has been superseded by later investigations, on the whole this article has considerable historical value.
 
Max Goebel was a German church historian, b. 13 March 1811 at Solingen, d. 13 December 1857 at Coblenz. He studied theology at the University of Bonn, served as pastor in Siegburg and Coblenz, where he made friendly contacts with J. G. Lübke at [[Neuwied (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Neuwied]] and [[Molenaar, Johannes (1810-1868)|Johannes Molenaar]] at [[Monsheim (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Monsheim]], who later became Mennonite preachers. He is the author of the important book, <em>Geschichte des christlichen Lebens in der rheinisch-westfälischen evangelischen Kirche</em> (Vol. I, 1849; Vol. II, 1852; Vol. III edited by Th. Link in 1860 from papers left by Goebel). In this work the Mennonites, especially those of the Rhineland, are given extensive, sympathetic treatment; much new material is presented, making the book an important source for the study of Mennonite history in the Rhineland. Never before had the [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]] movement received so thorough a presentation, based on study of the sources, or so just a characterization of its nature (see the excellent analysis of Anabaptism, Vol. I, 134-39, which is still of great value). Of especial interest is the attempt of the author to prove that [[Pietism|Pietism]] in the Rhineland can be traced back to the Anabaptist movement of the 16th century. The <em>Monatsschrift für die evangelische Kirche der Rheinprovinz</em>, which Max Goebel edited with C. F. Kling, contains an interesting article from his pen in 4 November 1848, pp. 228-40, "Die oberländischen Mennoniten" (erroneously called [[Hutterian Brethren (Hutterische Brüder)|Hutterites]]). They are [[Amish Mennonites|Amish Mennonites]], whom the author describes at first hand. Though some of the material is incorrect and has been superseded by later investigations, on the whole this article has considerable historical value.
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 130.
+
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 130.
  
 
<em>Mennonitische Blätter</em> (1858): 9.
 
<em>Mennonitische Blätter</em> (1858): 9.
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 535|date=1956|a1_last=Neff|a1_first=Christian|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 535|date=1956|a1_last=Neff|a1_first=Christian|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Revision as of 14:34, 23 August 2013

Max Goebel was a German church historian, b. 13 March 1811 at Solingen, d. 13 December 1857 at Coblenz. He studied theology at the University of Bonn, served as pastor in Siegburg and Coblenz, where he made friendly contacts with J. G. Lübke at Neuwied and Johannes Molenaar at Monsheim, who later became Mennonite preachers. He is the author of the important book, Geschichte des christlichen Lebens in der rheinisch-westfälischen evangelischen Kirche (Vol. I, 1849; Vol. II, 1852; Vol. III edited by Th. Link in 1860 from papers left by Goebel). In this work the Mennonites, especially those of the Rhineland, are given extensive, sympathetic treatment; much new material is presented, making the book an important source for the study of Mennonite history in the Rhineland. Never before had the Anabaptist movement received so thorough a presentation, based on study of the sources, or so just a characterization of its nature (see the excellent analysis of Anabaptism, Vol. I, 134-39, which is still of great value). Of especial interest is the attempt of the author to prove that Pietism in the Rhineland can be traced back to the Anabaptist movement of the 16th century. The Monatsschrift für die evangelische Kirche der Rheinprovinz, which Max Goebel edited with C. F. Kling, contains an interesting article from his pen in 4 November 1848, pp. 228-40, "Die oberländischen Mennoniten" (erroneously called Hutterites). They are Amish Mennonites, whom the author describes at first hand. Though some of the material is incorrect and has been superseded by later investigations, on the whole this article has considerable historical value.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 130.

Mennonitische Blätter (1858): 9.


Author(s) Christian Neff
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian. "Goebel, Max (1811-1857)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 1 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Goebel,_Max_(1811-1857)&oldid=94849.

APA style

Neff, Christian. (1956). Goebel, Max (1811-1857). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 1 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Goebel,_Max_(1811-1857)&oldid=94849.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 535. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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