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The Greenfield Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), 13 miles (20 km) southeast of Carnegie, Oklahoma, was founded 31 January 1914, when a meetinghouse was built, the group having been served for 12 years previously by ministers from the Gotebo congregation. A. W. Froese, the first resident pastor, began his service 15 February 1915. In 1926 the membership was 67 with Froese still serving; in 1955 it was 89 with J. B. Krause as pastor. After 1969 the congregation has not had a pastor; its membership of 23 (2007) was composed of 10 family groups. The families shared responsibility for worship services. The congregation belongs to the Western District Conference.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 192.

Additional Information

Address:

Meeting Place Directions:  6 mi S, 5 mi E, 2 mi S of Carnegie, Oklahoma

Denominational Affiliations:

Western District Conference

Mennonite Church USA


Author(s) De Lyon Nightingale
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Nightingale, De Lyon. "Greenfield Mennonite Church (Carnegie, Oklahoma, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 20 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Greenfield_Mennonite_Church_(Carnegie,_Oklahoma,_USA)&oldid=94932.

APA style

Nightingale, De Lyon. (1956). Greenfield Mennonite Church (Carnegie, Oklahoma, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Greenfield_Mennonite_Church_(Carnegie,_Oklahoma,_USA)&oldid=94932.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, pp. 575-576. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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