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Jacob Gross (ca. 1743-12 December 1810) was born in Germany about 1743 and immigrated to North America about 1763. He settled in Skippack, later moved to Germantown, and finally to Bedminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania. He married Mary Krall, and together they had six children. Four sons became church leaders: Christian, a minister in Deep Run; Jacob, a minister in Ontario; John K., a minister in Doylestown; and Daniel, a deacon in Deep Run. Jakob Gross was ordained a minister in Deep Run between 1773 and 1775. He preached in Germantown on 6 November 1796. By 1804 he was ordained a bishop of the Deep Run circuit, for in that year he interviewed Christian Funk, who had earlier been excommunicated, for possible reconciliation. Gross  was a farmer and shoemaker.

Gross' letter of 4 September 1801 to Lincoln County, Ontario, which gave counsel on organizing the first Mennonite Church in Canada, was published in Briefe an die Mennonisten Gemeine in Ober Canada (Berlin, ON, 1840).

A farewell letter written by Jakob Gross to his three churches in 1810 indicates his deep concern for their spiritual welfare, and also reflects the high esteem with which the laity regarded their spiritual leader. Bishop Gross died on 12 December 1810, and was buried in the Deep Run cemetery.


Author(s) Quintus Leatherman
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Leatherman, Quintus. "Gross, Jakob (1743-1810)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 28 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gross,_Jakob_(1743-1810)&oldid=87936.

APA style

Leatherman, Quintus. (1956). Gross, Jakob (1743-1810). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 28 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Gross,_Jakob_(1743-1810)&oldid=87936.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 599. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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