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Of essential significance to the settlement and its later development were the excellent traits of character, such as diligence, of the colonists and a good business sense, as well as the education they had acquired at home. From this village the emigration to [[Turkestan|Turkestan]] took place in 1880 and 1881 under the leadership of [[Epp, Claas (1838-1913)|Claas Epp, Jr.]], which caused the disintegration of Hahnsau.
 
Of essential significance to the settlement and its later development were the excellent traits of character, such as diligence, of the colonists and a good business sense, as well as the education they had acquired at home. From this village the emigration to [[Turkestan|Turkestan]] took place in 1880 and 1881 under the leadership of [[Epp, Claas (1838-1913)|Claas Epp, Jr.]], which caused the disintegration of Hahnsau.
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
<em>Am Trakt. Eine mennonitische Kolonie im mittleren Wolgagebiet</em>. North Kildonan, 1948:7-10.
 
<em>Am Trakt. Eine mennonitische Kolonie im mittleren Wolgagebiet</em>. North Kildonan, 1948:7-10.
  
 
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 233.
 
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 233.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 629|date=1956|a1_last=Epp|a1_first=David H.|a2_last=Krahn|a2_first=Cornelius}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 629|date=1956|a1_last=Epp|a1_first=David H.|a2_last=Krahn|a2_first=Cornelius}}

Revision as of 19:16, 20 August 2013

Hahnsau, the first village of the Trakt Mennonite settlement in the province of Samara, Russia, was founded in 1854 in the Malyshevka district by settlers direct from Prussia.

The original village had 25 Mennonite families with a total population of 163, all farmers. The village was named after Councilor Eduard von Hahn. The first group of settlers included a minister and two teachers. The establishment of the Hahnsau village succeeded well and rapidly, since most of the settlers were well-to-do; they had not only the 350 talers required by the Russian government of its immigrants, but also sufficient funds for building. The settlers Claas Epp, Sr., former Dorfschulze in Fürstenwerder (Danzig), and Johann Wall, a minister, had brought considerable capital with them. They were the delegates who had previously traveled to Russia to arrange the settlement with the government.

Of essential significance to the settlement and its later development were the excellent traits of character, such as diligence, of the colonists and a good business sense, as well as the education they had acquired at home. From this village the emigration to Turkestan took place in 1880 and 1881 under the leadership of Claas Epp, Jr., which caused the disintegration of Hahnsau.

Bibliography

Am Trakt. Eine mennonitische Kolonie im mittleren Wolgagebiet. North Kildonan, 1948:7-10.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. II, 233.


Author(s) David H. Epp
Cornelius Krahn
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Epp, David H. and Cornelius Krahn. "Hahnsau (Am Trakt Mennonite Settlement, Samara Oblast, Russia)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 30 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Hahnsau_(Am_Trakt_Mennonite_Settlement,_Samara_Oblast,_Russia)&oldid=81587.

APA style

Epp, David H. and Cornelius Krahn. (1956). Hahnsau (Am Trakt Mennonite Settlement, Samara Oblast, Russia). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 30 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Hahnsau_(Am_Trakt_Mennonite_Settlement,_Samara_Oblast,_Russia)&oldid=81587.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 629. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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