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The van Halmael family, now extinct, was in the 17th-19th centuries found among the members of the Mennonite churches both [[Lamist Mennonite Church (Amsterdam, Netherlands)|Lam]] and [[Zon, De (Amsterdam, Netherlands)|Zon]], at [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]], where they were mostly engaged in banking. Francois van Halmael (Halmale), b. about 1530, a descendant of an old family, emigrated from [[Belgium|Belgium]]. He was a soldier and was active during the capture of [[Brielle (Zuid-Holland, Netherlands)|Brielle]], Holland, in 1572. In his old age he joined the Mennonite Church, retired from all political and military business, and resided at [[Wesel (Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany)|Wesel]] on the Rhine, [[Germany|Germany]]. Of his children, who were cloth-merchants, five moved to Holland, Israel van Halmael to [[Rotterdam (Zuid-Holland, Netherlands)|Rotterdam]], where he became a preacher of the Flemish congregation until he resigned in 1645 at an old age; Abraham, Jacob, Otto, and Isaak van Halmael moved to Amsterdam. Abraham (b. 1573?) became a deacon of the Amsterdam Old Flemish congregation "bij de Kruikjes" in 1616 and a preacher in 1619, and served until 1624, when he moved to [[Utrecht (Utrecht, Netherlands)|Utrecht]]. He died there in 1630. (Kühler, <em>Geschiedenis</em> II: 131, note 2.) Another Abraham van Halmael was preacher of the "Lamen Toren" congregation at Amsterdam from 1675 until his death in 1679. This family, which was very influential in the Amsterdam business life in the 17th and 18th centuries, and related by marriage to a large number of prominent Mennonite families, provided many deacons. Jacob Otto van Halmael, a deacon in the Amsterdam Flemish congregation, sided with [[Galenus Abrahamsz de Haan (1622-1706)|Galenus Abrahamsz]] in the "[[Lammerenkrijgh|Lammerenkrijgh]]," a quarrel in this congregation, and with Michiel Comans published three pamphlets in 1664 (<em>Waerschouwinge</em>; <em>Antwoordt op de Waerschouwinge</em>; and <em>Tweede Waerschouwinge</em>). Hendrick van Halmael (1654-ca. 1720), a grandson of Jacob, wrote a number of tragedies.
 
The van Halmael family, now extinct, was in the 17th-19th centuries found among the members of the Mennonite churches both [[Lamist Mennonite Church (Amsterdam, Netherlands)|Lam]] and [[Zon, De (Amsterdam, Netherlands)|Zon]], at [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]], where they were mostly engaged in banking. Francois van Halmael (Halmale), b. about 1530, a descendant of an old family, emigrated from [[Belgium|Belgium]]. He was a soldier and was active during the capture of [[Brielle (Zuid-Holland, Netherlands)|Brielle]], Holland, in 1572. In his old age he joined the Mennonite Church, retired from all political and military business, and resided at [[Wesel (Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany)|Wesel]] on the Rhine, [[Germany|Germany]]. Of his children, who were cloth-merchants, five moved to Holland, Israel van Halmael to [[Rotterdam (Zuid-Holland, Netherlands)|Rotterdam]], where he became a preacher of the Flemish congregation until he resigned in 1645 at an old age; Abraham, Jacob, Otto, and Isaak van Halmael moved to Amsterdam. Abraham (b. 1573?) became a deacon of the Amsterdam Old Flemish congregation "bij de Kruikjes" in 1616 and a preacher in 1619, and served until 1624, when he moved to [[Utrecht (Utrecht, Netherlands)|Utrecht]]. He died there in 1630. (Kühler, <em>Geschiedenis</em> II: 131, note 2.) Another Abraham van Halmael was preacher of the "Lamen Toren" congregation at Amsterdam from 1675 until his death in 1679. This family, which was very influential in the Amsterdam business life in the 17th and 18th centuries, and related by marriage to a large number of prominent Mennonite families, provided many deacons. Jacob Otto van Halmael, a deacon in the Amsterdam Flemish congregation, sided with [[Galenus Abrahamsz de Haan (1622-1706)|Galenus Abrahamsz]] in the "[[Lammerenkrijgh|Lammerenkrijgh]]," a quarrel in this congregation, and with Michiel Comans published three pamphlets in 1664 (<em>Waerschouwinge</em>; <em>Antwoordt op de Waerschouwinge</em>; and <em>Tweede Waerschouwinge</em>). Hendrick van Halmael (1654-ca. 1720), a grandson of Jacob, wrote a number of tragedies.
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. <em>Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam</em>. 2 v. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884: I: Nos. 1715 f.;  II: Nos.  115 f., 314, 1459 f.
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Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. <em>Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam</em>, 2 vols. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884: I: Nos. 1715 f.;  II: Nos.  115 f., 314, 1459 f.
  
 
<em>Nederland's Patriciaat</em> 26 (1940): 60-64.
 
<em>Nederland's Patriciaat</em> 26 (1940): 60-64.
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 637|date=1956|a1_last=van der Zijpp|a1_first=Nanne|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
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{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 637|date=1956|a1_last=Zijpp|a1_first=Nanne van der|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Revision as of 17:17, 23 January 2014

The van Halmael family, now extinct, was in the 17th-19th centuries found among the members of the Mennonite churches both Lam and Zon, at Amsterdam, where they were mostly engaged in banking. Francois van Halmael (Halmale), b. about 1530, a descendant of an old family, emigrated from Belgium. He was a soldier and was active during the capture of Brielle, Holland, in 1572. In his old age he joined the Mennonite Church, retired from all political and military business, and resided at Wesel on the Rhine, Germany. Of his children, who were cloth-merchants, five moved to Holland, Israel van Halmael to Rotterdam, where he became a preacher of the Flemish congregation until he resigned in 1645 at an old age; Abraham, Jacob, Otto, and Isaak van Halmael moved to Amsterdam. Abraham (b. 1573?) became a deacon of the Amsterdam Old Flemish congregation "bij de Kruikjes" in 1616 and a preacher in 1619, and served until 1624, when he moved to Utrecht. He died there in 1630. (Kühler, Geschiedenis II: 131, note 2.) Another Abraham van Halmael was preacher of the "Lamen Toren" congregation at Amsterdam from 1675 until his death in 1679. This family, which was very influential in the Amsterdam business life in the 17th and 18th centuries, and related by marriage to a large number of prominent Mennonite families, provided many deacons. Jacob Otto van Halmael, a deacon in the Amsterdam Flemish congregation, sided with Galenus Abrahamsz in the "Lammerenkrijgh," a quarrel in this congregation, and with Michiel Comans published three pamphlets in 1664 (Waerschouwinge; Antwoordt op de Waerschouwinge; and Tweede Waerschouwinge). Hendrick van Halmael (1654-ca. 1720), a grandson of Jacob, wrote a number of tragedies.

Bibliography

Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam, 2 vols. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884: I: Nos. 1715 f.;  II: Nos.  115 f., 314, 1459 f.

Nederland's Patriciaat 26 (1940): 60-64.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Halmael, van, family." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 2 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Halmael,_van,_family&oldid=111776.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1956). Halmael, van, family. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 2 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Halmael,_van,_family&oldid=111776.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 637. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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