Difference between revisions of "Huber Mennonite Preaching Appointment (Gormley, Ontario, Canada)"

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Huber ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]) was a "preaching appointment" in York County, [[Ontario (Canada)|Ontario]], which appeared in the [[Calendar of Appointments|<em>Calendar of Appointments</em>]] for 1854. In 1858 the meeting place was given as Whitchurch Township, which is north of Markham. The Mennonite minister Martin Huber (Hoover) resided near the present village of Gormley for several years before moving to [[Indiana (USA)|Indiana]] in 1857. It appears that services were held in or near his home before he left this section. The name [[Stecklin Mennonite Preaching Appointment (Stouffville, Ontario, Canada)|Stecklin]] is later used in referring to this settlement. Stecklin alternated in services with Huber before the building of the [[Almira Mennonite Meetinghouse (Unionville, Ontario, Canada)|Almira Meetinghouse]] in I860. The Steckley pioneers lived a few miles east of Huber at Bethesda village.
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Huber ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]) was a "preaching appointment" in York County, [[Ontario (Canada)|Ontario]], which appeared in the [[Calendar of Appointments|<em>Calendar of Appointments</em>]] for 1854. In 1858 the meeting place was given as Whitchurch Township, which is north of Markham. The Mennonite minister Martin Huber (Hoover) resided near the present village of Gormley for several years before moving to [[Indiana (USA)|Indiana]] in 1857. It appears that services were held in or near his home before he left this section. The name [[Stecklin Mennonite Preaching Appointment (Stouffville, Ontario, Canada)|Stecklin]] is later used in referring to this settlement. Stecklin alternated in services with Huber before the building of the [[Almira Mennonite Meetinghouse (Unionville, Ontario, Canada)|Almira Meetinghouse]] in I860. The Steckley pioneers lived a few miles east of Huber at Bethesda village.
  
 
See [[Stecklin Mennonite Preaching Appointment (Stouffville, Ontario, Canada)|Stecklin]]
 
See [[Stecklin Mennonite Preaching Appointment (Stouffville, Ontario, Canada)|Stecklin]]
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 825|date=1956|a1_last=Fretz|a1_first=Joseph C.|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 2, p. 825|date=1956|a1_last=Fretz|a1_first=Joseph C.|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Latest revision as of 14:04, 23 August 2013

Huber (Mennonite Church) was a "preaching appointment" in York County, Ontario, which appeared in the Calendar of Appointments for 1854. In 1858 the meeting place was given as Whitchurch Township, which is north of Markham. The Mennonite minister Martin Huber (Hoover) resided near the present village of Gormley for several years before moving to Indiana in 1857. It appears that services were held in or near his home before he left this section. The name Stecklin is later used in referring to this settlement. Stecklin alternated in services with Huber before the building of the Almira Meetinghouse in I860. The Steckley pioneers lived a few miles east of Huber at Bethesda village.

See Stecklin


Author(s) Joseph C. Fretz
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Fretz, Joseph C.. "Huber Mennonite Preaching Appointment (Gormley, Ontario, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 23 Aug 2017. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Huber_Mennonite_Preaching_Appointment_(Gormley,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=92053.

APA style

Fretz, Joseph C.. (1956). Huber Mennonite Preaching Appointment (Gormley, Ontario, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 23 August 2017, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Huber_Mennonite_Preaching_Appointment_(Gormley,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=92053.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 825. All rights reserved.


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