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Jan Volkertsz Trypmaker (Tripmaker; he was a maker of "trips," a kind of wooden shoes), born at [[Hoorn (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Hoorn]], Dutch province of [[North Holland (Netherlands)|North Holland]], a Dutch [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]] leader, who founded the [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]] congregation. In 1530 Trypmaker was in [[Emden (Niedersachsen, Germany)|Emden]], [[East Friesland (Niedersachsen, Germany)|East Friesland]], where [[Hoffman, Melchior (ca. 1495-1544?) |Melchior Hoffman]] had founded an Anabaptist congregation, which he put under the care of Trypmaker when he left Emden; a few months later, about November 1530, Trypmaker also had to leave Emden, driven away by the intolerance of the Reformed preachers. Trypmaker then moved to Amsterdam, where he was active about one year. There is only scarce information about his activities. He is said to have baptized "many persons"; he also performed marriages; apparently his field of activity was also outside Amsterdam. In Amsterdam he was not much hindered by the city magistrates. So he could found and build up the congregation in the peaceful Anabaptist principles which he had learned from Melchior Hoffman. In the fall of 1531, when the Court of Holland at The Hague learned of his activities, the city magistrates of Amsterdam were summoned to arrest Trypmaker. [[Hubrechts, Jan (16th century)|Jan Hubrechts]], then a burgomaster of Amsterdam, had to obey the order from The Hague, but being opposed to persecution, he tried to save Trypmaker, but Trypmaker gave himself up to the police, confessing that he was rebaptized. Trypmaker was sent to The Hague and tried there. During his trial he reported the names of more than 50 Anabaptists in Amsterdam; seven of them then were arrested and also sent to The Hague. Here they died together with Trypmaker, being beheaded on 5 December 1531. Their heads were afterwards sent to Amsterdam and exhibited there as a warning. Shortly before his execution Trypmaker had recanted as had all the seven other prisoners. For this reason they have not been included in the martyrbooks.
 
Jan Volkertsz Trypmaker (Tripmaker; he was a maker of "trips," a kind of wooden shoes), born at [[Hoorn (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Hoorn]], Dutch province of [[North Holland (Netherlands)|North Holland]], a Dutch [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]] leader, who founded the [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]] congregation. In 1530 Trypmaker was in [[Emden (Niedersachsen, Germany)|Emden]], [[East Friesland (Niedersachsen, Germany)|East Friesland]], where [[Hoffman, Melchior (ca. 1495-1544?) |Melchior Hoffman]] had founded an Anabaptist congregation, which he put under the care of Trypmaker when he left Emden; a few months later, about November 1530, Trypmaker also had to leave Emden, driven away by the intolerance of the Reformed preachers. Trypmaker then moved to Amsterdam, where he was active about one year. There is only scarce information about his activities. He is said to have baptized "many persons"; he also performed marriages; apparently his field of activity was also outside Amsterdam. In Amsterdam he was not much hindered by the city magistrates. So he could found and build up the congregation in the peaceful Anabaptist principles which he had learned from Melchior Hoffman. In the fall of 1531, when the Court of Holland at The Hague learned of his activities, the city magistrates of Amsterdam were summoned to arrest Trypmaker. [[Hubrechts, Jan (16th century)|Jan Hubrechts]], then a burgomaster of Amsterdam, had to obey the order from The Hague, but being opposed to persecution, he tried to save Trypmaker, but Trypmaker gave himself up to the police, confessing that he was rebaptized. Trypmaker was sent to The Hague and tried there. During his trial he reported the names of more than 50 Anabaptists in Amsterdam; seven of them then were arrested and also sent to The Hague. Here they died together with Trypmaker, being beheaded on 5 December 1531. Their heads were afterwards sent to Amsterdam and exhibited there as a warning. Shortly before his execution Trypmaker had recanted as had all the seven other prisoners. For this reason they have not been included in the martyrbooks.
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Cornelius, C. A. <em>Geschichte des münsterischen Aufruhrs in drei Büchern</em>. Leipzig: T.O. Weigel, 1855: II, 404 f., 409.
 
Cornelius, C. A. <em>Geschichte des münsterischen Aufruhrs in drei Büchern</em>. Leipzig: T.O. Weigel, 1855: II, 404 f., 409.
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Kühler, Wilhelmus Johannes. <em>Geschiedenis der Nederlandsche Doopsgezinden in de Zestiende Eeuw</em>. Haarlem: H.D. Tjeenk Willink, 1932: 64-68.
 
Kühler, Wilhelmus Johannes. <em>Geschiedenis der Nederlandsche Doopsgezinden in de Zestiende Eeuw</em>. Haarlem: H.D. Tjeenk Willink, 1932: 64-68.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 84|date=1957|a1_last=van der Zijpp|a1_first=Nanne|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 84|date=1957|a1_last=van der Zijpp|a1_first=Nanne|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Revision as of 19:21, 20 August 2013

Jan Volkertsz Trypmaker (Tripmaker; he was a maker of "trips," a kind of wooden shoes), born at Hoorn, Dutch province of North Holland, a Dutch Anabaptist leader, who founded the Amsterdam congregation. In 1530 Trypmaker was in Emden, East Friesland, where Melchior Hoffman had founded an Anabaptist congregation, which he put under the care of Trypmaker when he left Emden; a few months later, about November 1530, Trypmaker also had to leave Emden, driven away by the intolerance of the Reformed preachers. Trypmaker then moved to Amsterdam, where he was active about one year. There is only scarce information about his activities. He is said to have baptized "many persons"; he also performed marriages; apparently his field of activity was also outside Amsterdam. In Amsterdam he was not much hindered by the city magistrates. So he could found and build up the congregation in the peaceful Anabaptist principles which he had learned from Melchior Hoffman. In the fall of 1531, when the Court of Holland at The Hague learned of his activities, the city magistrates of Amsterdam were summoned to arrest Trypmaker. Jan Hubrechts, then a burgomaster of Amsterdam, had to obey the order from The Hague, but being opposed to persecution, he tried to save Trypmaker, but Trypmaker gave himself up to the police, confessing that he was rebaptized. Trypmaker was sent to The Hague and tried there. During his trial he reported the names of more than 50 Anabaptists in Amsterdam; seven of them then were arrested and also sent to The Hague. Here they died together with Trypmaker, being beheaded on 5 December 1531. Their heads were afterwards sent to Amsterdam and exhibited there as a warning. Shortly before his execution Trypmaker had recanted as had all the seven other prisoners. For this reason they have not been included in the martyrbooks.

Bibliography

Cornelius, C. A. Geschichte des münsterischen Aufruhrs in drei Büchern. Leipzig: T.O. Weigel, 1855: II, 404 f., 409.

Doopsgezinde Bijdragen (1917): 111, 159 f.; (1919)": 135-139.

Hoop Scheffer, Jacob Gijsbert de. Inventaris der Archiefstukken berustende bij de Vereenigde Doopsgezinde Gemeente to Amsterdam, 2 vols. Amsterdam: Uitgegeven en ten geschenke aangeboden door den Kerkeraad dier Gemeente, 1883-1884: I, No. 6.

Kühler, Wilhelmus Johannes. Geschiedenis der Nederlandsche Doopsgezinden in de Zestiende Eeuw. Haarlem: H.D. Tjeenk Willink, 1932: 64-68.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. "Jan Volkertsz Trypmaker (d. 1531)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 27 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Jan_Volkertsz_Trypmaker_(d._1531)&oldid=82613.

APA style

van der Zijpp, Nanne. (1957). Jan Volkertsz Trypmaker (d. 1531). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 27 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Jan_Volkertsz_Trypmaker_(d._1531)&oldid=82613.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 84. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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