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[[File:Kherson1.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Source: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ukraine_location_map.svg Wikipedia Commons] Wikipedia Commons
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[[File:Kherson1.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Source: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ukraine_location_map.svg Wikipedia Commons]'']]    Kherson, a city (2004 population 303,900; 1939 population 97,186) in the [[Ukraine|Ukraine]], [[Russia|Russia]], on the right bank of the Dnieper, 15 miles (25 km) before its opening into the Black Sea. The province of Kherson numbered 2,100,000 inhabitants in 2004 (700,000 in 1946) with its 10,000 square miles. It was one of the largest provinces in the country, bounded by the Dnieper and Dniester rivers and the Black Sea, its soil fertile and adapted to wheat raising. The population was mixed, made up of immigrants, including a large number of Germans, who in 1804, 1808, 1817 and later established more than 150 villages with 810,000 acres of land.
 
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'']]    Kherson, a city (2004 population 303,900; 1939 population 97,186) in the [[Ukraine|Ukraine]], [[Russia|Russia]], on the right bank of the Dnieper, 15 miles (25 km) before its opening into the Black Sea. The province of Kherson numbered 2,100,000 inhabitants in 2004 (700,000 in 1946) with its 10,000 square miles. It was one of the largest provinces in the country, bounded by the Dnieper and Dniester rivers and the Black Sea, its soil fertile and adapted to wheat raising. The population was mixed, made up of immigrants, including a large number of Germans, who in 1804, 1808, 1817 and later established more than 150 villages with 810,000 acres of land.
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In 1871 the [[Molotschna Mennonite Settlement (Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Molotschna Mennonite]] volosts, Halbstadt and Gnadenfeld, purchased over 54,000 acres situated north of the opening of the Vizan into the Ingulets, where they established the Mennonite daughter settlement of [[Zagradovka Mennonite Settlement (Kherson Oblast, Ukraine)|Zagradovka]] with 16 villages, which for the most part had the names of Molotschna villages (Ohrloff,<strong> </strong>Tiege, etc.). In 1918 the settlement owned over 86,400 acres not including the very important private farms. There were also several daughter villages of this settlement in the province of Kherson, partly on their own land, and partly on rented land. The Mennonite population numbered five to six thousand people, of whom one fifth belonged to the [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]], with a meetinghouse in [[Tiege Mennonite Brethren Church (Zagradovka Mennonite Settlement, Kherson Oblast, Ukraine)|Tiege]], and the others to the [[Kirchliche Mennoniten|Mennonite Church]], with a church in Nikolaifeld, where a central school was also built for the district in 1895. Near this colony was located one of the forestry services on which the Mennonites satisfied requirements for military duty. In addition the settlement founded a daughter colony in 1894 near [[Tempelhof (Stavropol Krai, Russia)|Tempelhof]] in the province of Stavropol and in 1909 the larger one near [[Barnaul Mennonite Settlement (Siberia, Russia)|Barnaul]]<em>. </em>
 
In 1871 the [[Molotschna Mennonite Settlement (Zaporizhia Oblast, Ukraine)|Molotschna Mennonite]] volosts, Halbstadt and Gnadenfeld, purchased over 54,000 acres situated north of the opening of the Vizan into the Ingulets, where they established the Mennonite daughter settlement of [[Zagradovka Mennonite Settlement (Kherson Oblast, Ukraine)|Zagradovka]] with 16 villages, which for the most part had the names of Molotschna villages (Ohrloff,<strong> </strong>Tiege, etc.). In 1918 the settlement owned over 86,400 acres not including the very important private farms. There were also several daughter villages of this settlement in the province of Kherson, partly on their own land, and partly on rented land. The Mennonite population numbered five to six thousand people, of whom one fifth belonged to the [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]], with a meetinghouse in [[Tiege Mennonite Brethren Church (Zagradovka Mennonite Settlement, Kherson Oblast, Ukraine)|Tiege]], and the others to the [[Kirchliche Mennoniten|Mennonite Church]], with a church in Nikolaifeld, where a central school was also built for the district in 1895. Near this colony was located one of the forestry services on which the Mennonites satisfied requirements for military duty. In addition the settlement founded a daughter colony in 1894 near [[Tempelhof (Stavropol Krai, Russia)|Tempelhof]] in the province of Stavropol and in 1909 the larger one near [[Barnaul Mennonite Settlement (Siberia, Russia)|Barnaul]]<em>. </em>

Revision as of 14:06, 23 August 2013

Kherson, a city (2004 population 303,900; 1939 population 97,186) in the Ukraine, Russia, on the right bank of the Dnieper, 15 miles (25 km) before its opening into the Black Sea. The province of Kherson numbered 2,100,000 inhabitants in 2004 (700,000 in 1946) with its 10,000 square miles. It was one of the largest provinces in the country, bounded by the Dnieper and Dniester rivers and the Black Sea, its soil fertile and adapted to wheat raising. The population was mixed, made up of immigrants, including a large number of Germans, who in 1804, 1808, 1817 and later established more than 150 villages with 810,000 acres of land.

In 1871 the Molotschna Mennonite volosts, Halbstadt and Gnadenfeld, purchased over 54,000 acres situated north of the opening of the Vizan into the Ingulets, where they established the Mennonite daughter settlement of Zagradovka with 16 villages, which for the most part had the names of Molotschna villages (Ohrloff, Tiege, etc.). In 1918 the settlement owned over 86,400 acres not including the very important private farms. There were also several daughter villages of this settlement in the province of Kherson, partly on their own land, and partly on rented land. The Mennonite population numbered five to six thousand people, of whom one fifth belonged to the Mennonite Brethren, with a meetinghouse in Tiege, and the others to the Mennonite Church, with a church in Nikolaifeld, where a central school was also built for the district in 1895. Near this colony was located one of the forestry services on which the Mennonites satisfied requirements for military duty. In addition the settlement founded a daughter colony in 1894 near Tempelhof in the province of Stavropol and in 1909 the larger one near Barnaul.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I, 340.


Author(s) Cornelius Bergmann
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Bergmann, Cornelius. "Kherson (Kherson Oblast, Ukraine)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 25 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Kherson_(Kherson_Oblast,_Ukraine)&oldid=92279.

APA style

Bergmann, Cornelius. (1957). Kherson (Kherson Oblast, Ukraine). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 25 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Kherson_(Kherson_Oblast,_Ukraine)&oldid=92279.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, pp. 172-173. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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