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Klubnikovo, a village in the Ural Mountains of [[Orenburg Mennonite Settlement (Orenburg Oblast, Russia)|Orenburg]], [[Russia|Russia]], was the seat of a subsidiary congregation of the Mennonite Brethren Church of [[Kamenka (Orenburg Mennonite Settlement, Orenburg Oblast, Russia)|Kamenka]]. It included the villages of [[Aliessovo (Orenburg Mennonite Settlement, Orenburg Oblast, Russia)|Aliessovo]], Stepanovka, Klubnikovo, Kubanka, Kitchkas, Rodnichnoye, Dolinovka, and [[Dobrovka (Orenburg Mennonite Settlement, Orenburg Oblast, Russia)|Dobrovka]]. In 1906 a large church was built in Klubnikovo, which was closed by the Soviets in 1931 and used for grain storage. The leading ministers of Klubnikovo were Jakob Friesen (Kitchkas) to 1911, Heinrich H. Kröger (Aliessovo) to 1921, and Peter P. Funk (Kubanka). Preachers were Johann J. Block (Dolinovka), died 1912, [[Rempel, Johann D. (1874-1938?)|Johann D. Rempel]] (Rodnichnoye), David H. Kröger (Kubanka), Jakob J. Martens (Rodnichnoye), Gerhard D. Rempel (Rodnichnoye), and Heinrich Brucks (Kubanka).
 
Klubnikovo, a village in the Ural Mountains of [[Orenburg Mennonite Settlement (Orenburg Oblast, Russia)|Orenburg]], [[Russia|Russia]], was the seat of a subsidiary congregation of the Mennonite Brethren Church of [[Kamenka (Orenburg Mennonite Settlement, Orenburg Oblast, Russia)|Kamenka]]. It included the villages of [[Aliessovo (Orenburg Mennonite Settlement, Orenburg Oblast, Russia)|Aliessovo]], Stepanovka, Klubnikovo, Kubanka, Kitchkas, Rodnichnoye, Dolinovka, and [[Dobrovka (Orenburg Mennonite Settlement, Orenburg Oblast, Russia)|Dobrovka]]. In 1906 a large church was built in Klubnikovo, which was closed by the Soviets in 1931 and used for grain storage. The leading ministers of Klubnikovo were Jakob Friesen (Kitchkas) to 1911, Heinrich H. Kröger (Aliessovo) to 1921, and Peter P. Funk (Kubanka). Preachers were Johann J. Block (Dolinovka), died 1912, [[Rempel, Johann D. (1874-1938?)|Johann D. Rempel]] (Rodnichnoye), David H. Kröger (Kubanka), Jakob J. Martens (Rodnichnoye), Gerhard D. Rempel (Rodnichnoye), and Heinrich Brucks (Kubanka).
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 207|date=1957|a1_last=Quiring|a1_first=Walter|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 207|date=1957|a1_last=Quiring|a1_first=Walter|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Revision as of 19:21, 20 August 2013

Klubnikovo, a village in the Ural Mountains of Orenburg, Russia, was the seat of a subsidiary congregation of the Mennonite Brethren Church of Kamenka. It included the villages of Aliessovo, Stepanovka, Klubnikovo, Kubanka, Kitchkas, Rodnichnoye, Dolinovka, and Dobrovka. In 1906 a large church was built in Klubnikovo, which was closed by the Soviets in 1931 and used for grain storage. The leading ministers of Klubnikovo were Jakob Friesen (Kitchkas) to 1911, Heinrich H. Kröger (Aliessovo) to 1921, and Peter P. Funk (Kubanka). Preachers were Johann J. Block (Dolinovka), died 1912, Johann D. Rempel (Rodnichnoye), David H. Kröger (Kubanka), Jakob J. Martens (Rodnichnoye), Gerhard D. Rempel (Rodnichnoye), and Heinrich Brucks (Kubanka).


Author(s) Walter Quiring
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Quiring, Walter. "Klubnikovo (Orenburg Mennonite Settlement, Orenburg Oblast, Russia)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 26 Jul 2017. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Klubnikovo_(Orenburg_Mennonite_Settlement,_Orenburg_Oblast,_Russia)&oldid=82777.

APA style

Quiring, Walter. (1957). Klubnikovo (Orenburg Mennonite Settlement, Orenburg Oblast, Russia). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 July 2017, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Klubnikovo_(Orenburg_Mennonite_Settlement,_Orenburg_Oblast,_Russia)&oldid=82777.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 207. All rights reserved.


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