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Maritgen Ysbrandsdochter, an Anabaptist martyr. She was the wife of Jan van Leyden, and lived at Leiden, Dutch province of South Holland, where she kept the inn "Three Herrings." Here she was (re) baptized in November 1533 by Jan Matthijsz van Haarlem. In March 1534 she was one of the Anabaptists who sailed from Amsterdam en route to Münster, Westphalia, but being arrested at Bergklooster she was pardoned, apparently having recanted. Back in Leiden, however, she continued to gather revolutionary Anabaptists in her house, while her husband reigned in Münster as "King of Zion." In another house, also belonging to Maritgen, the Anabaptists also used to meet; here a plan was made to attack the city of Leiden (and perhaps also Amsterdam), but this project being betrayed, Maritgen was arrested on 23 January 1535, and on 11 February or shortly after, put to death at Leiden by burning at the stake.

Bibliography

Mellink, Albert F. De Wederdopers in de noordelijke Nederlanden 1531-1544. Groningen: J.B. Wolters, 1954: 188, 195, 201.

Molhuysen, P. C. and  P. J. Blok. Nieuw Nederlandsch Biografisch Woordenboek. Leiden, 1911-1937: V, 1163.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Maritgen Ysbrandsdochter (d. 1535)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 18 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Maritgen_Ysbrandsdochter_(d._1535)&oldid=108797.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1957). Maritgen Ysbrandsdochter (d. 1535). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Maritgen_Ysbrandsdochter_(d._1535)&oldid=108797.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 488. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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