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Because many girls from outside this immediate area were working as domestics in Reading, and a few were attending night school or taking nurses' training in the city hospital, the Girls' Home was opened at 704 N. 12th Street in 1935, to serve as a home for those who roomed away from their place of employment and as a congregating center for the others on hours off duty. These benefits, with a licensed placement agency, made this a real home for such girls. Margaret Horst was for many years matron of the Home. As a home and girls' center only it continued over the years, with Elsie Gehman as chairman of the management. It was sponsored by the Eastern Board of Missions and Charities, and was a real asset to Mennonite missions in the city. In 1937 alone, 63 girls had contact with the Home, and in two years 150 girls from thirteen states and numerous conferences used its facilities.  
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Because many girls from outside this immediate area were working as domestics in Reading, and a few were attending night school or taking nurses' training in the city hospital, the Girls' Home was opened at 704 N. 12th Street in 1935, to serve as a home for those who roomed away from their place of employment and as a congregating center for the others on hours off duty. These benefits, with a licensed placement agency, made this a real home for such girls. Margaret Horst was for many years matron of the Home. As a home and girls' center only it continued over the years, with Elsie Gehman as chairman of the management. It was sponsored by the Eastern Board of Missions and Charities, and was a real asset to Mennonite missions in the city. In 1937 alone, 63 girls had contact with the Home, and in two years 150 girls from thirteen states and numerous conferences used its facilities.
 
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{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 623|date=1957|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 623|date=1957|a1_last=Landis|a1_first=Ira D|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Revision as of 19:56, 20 August 2013

Because many girls from outside this immediate area were working as domestics in Reading, and a few were attending night school or taking nurses' training in the city hospital, the Girls' Home was opened at 704 N. 12th Street in 1935, to serve as a home for those who roomed away from their place of employment and as a congregating center for the others on hours off duty. These benefits, with a licensed placement agency, made this a real home for such girls. Margaret Horst was for many years matron of the Home. As a home and girls' center only it continued over the years, with Elsie Gehman as chairman of the management. It was sponsored by the Eastern Board of Missions and Charities, and was a real asset to Mennonite missions in the city. In 1937 alone, 63 girls had contact with the Home, and in two years 150 girls from thirteen states and numerous conferences used its facilities.


Author(s) Ira D Landis
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Landis, Ira D. "Mennonite Girls' Home (Reading, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 1 Aug 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Mennonite_Girls%27_Home_(Reading,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=89730.

APA style

Landis, Ira D. (1957). Mennonite Girls' Home (Reading, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 1 August 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Mennonite_Girls%27_Home_(Reading,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=89730.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 623. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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