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Mount Pisgah Mennonite Church (Mennonite Church USA), located about five miles (8 km) northwest of Leonard, Shelby County, Missouri, and sometimes known as the Cherry Box congregation, was organized probably about 1868, with perhaps 20 charter members. Benjamin Lapp was the first minister and Christian Lapp the first deacon. In 1870 Benjamin F. Hershey, from the Science Ridge congregation, Sterling, Illinois, moved into this community and is thought to have been the first bishop of the congregation. The first church was built probably in 1872 about one and one-half miles ( 2 1/2 km) south of Cherry Box. It was replaced by the present church, located a just south of Cherry Box, in 1899; this church was remodeled in 1956. The congregation has never been large; the membership in 1956 was 48; in 2003, 58. Other bishops who served the congregation were David Kauffman, Daniel Kauffman, J. M. Kreider, Nelson Kauffman, and Daniel Kauffman, the present bishop. Other ministers who have served are John Brubaker, Wallace Kauffman, L. J. Johnston, George Bissey, John M. Yoder, and Daniel Kauffman (ordained bishop in 1952). Mount Pisgah is part of the South Central Mennonite Conference.


Date Published 1957


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MLA style

, . "Mount Pisgah Mennonite Church (Leonard, Missouri, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 26 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Mount_Pisgah_Mennonite_Church_(Leonard,_Missouri,_USA)&oldid=90208.

APA style

, . (1957). Mount Pisgah Mennonite Church (Leonard, Missouri, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Mount_Pisgah_Mennonite_Church_(Leonard,_Missouri,_USA)&oldid=90208.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 759. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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