Mukebai Ambroise

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Born to Baluba parents, Mukebai's parents eventually found their way to Tshikapa, a growing urban center on the banks of the Kasai River in south central Belgian Congo (Democratic Republic of Congo). As a child Mukebai enrolled in primary school of the Congo Inland Mission (Africa Inter-Mennonite Mission). Post-primary formal Bible training was limited, so Mukebai spent much time in personal study of his Tshiluba Bible. He was proposed by his church district as a pastoral candidate and upon ordination was asked to start a new congregation in Kele, a growing suburb of Tshikapa. In this setting his ability as a pastor and preacher soon became evident.

Quiet in demeanor but with a direct gaze and a quick smile, he initially held meetings in a school building which soon became overcrowded. Instead of looking to the mission for help he introduced an extra Sunday morning offering for a building fund, which he insisted be placed in the hands of a lay committee. In due time a large chapel was constructed completely by local efforts.

Mukebai incorporated much of African flavor into his preaching and worship services, while consistently insisting upon the preeminence of Scripture over cultural patterns. He also successfully encouraged members to participate in the life of the church. In a land where pastoral roles are frequently confused with those of a traditional chief, Mukebai's low profile was remarkably effective


Author(s) James E Bertsche
Date Published 1987


Cite This Article

MLA style

Bertsche, James E. "Mukebai Ambroise." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1987. Web. 22 May 2018. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Mukebai_Ambroise&oldid=90266.

APA style

Bertsche, James E. (1987). Mukebai Ambroise. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 22 May 2018, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Mukebai_Ambroise&oldid=90266.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 5, pp. 605-606. All rights reserved.


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