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[[File:Niclaes.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Engraving from Apocalypsis, or The revelation  
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[[File:Niclaes.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Engraving from Apocalypsis, or The revelation of certain notorious advancers of heresie. London, 1655.<br />
 
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Scan provided  by the [https://uwaterloo.ca/mennonite-archives-ontario/ Mennonite Archives of Ontario].'']]     
of certain notorious advancers of heresie.  
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Hendrik (Heinrich) Niclaes was the founder of the [[Family of Love|Familists]] or the "House of Love," also called [[Nicolaites|Nicolaites]]. He was a native of [[Münster Anabaptists|Münster]], [[Westphalia (Germany)|Westphalia]], [[Germany|Germany]]. He had visions as a boy, entered a Latin school at the age of nine, but three years later worked in his father's business until he married and took over a business of his own. At the age of 27 he was arrested on a suspicion of Lutheran beliefs, and then moved to [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]]. Here he was arrested on a suspicion of being a "Münsterite." After his release he stayed nine years longer in Amsterdam. At the age of 39, while he was living in Emden, [[East Friesland (Niedersachsen, Germany)|East Friesland]], where he owned a thriving business, he had prophetic visions and gathered a following. When he was 59 he was again imprisoned and tried on the rack. He escaped to [[Kampen (Overijssel, Netherlands)|Kampen]], Dutch province of [[Overijssel (Netherlands)|Overijssel]], and from there to London and Cologne. He was a prolific writer. [[Nippold, Friedrich (1838-1918)|Nippold]] names 51 titles from his pen, which deal with a mystical pantheism.The disloyalty of some friends embittered the last years of his life. With [[David Joris (ca. 1501-1556)|David Joris ]]he carried on a brief literary dispute. Other [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]] connections cannot be claimed, as some older histories erroneously assert. In [[Netherlands|Holland]] he had few adherents. Only in [[Dordrecht (Zuid-Holland, Netherlands)|Dordrecht]] was there a group of followers until about 1614. Among his most influential followers was Christoffel Plantijn (1520-1589), noted printer at [[Antwerp (Belgium)|Antwerp]].
 
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London, 1655.  
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Scan provided  by the [http://grebel.uwaterloo.ca/mao/ Mennonite Archives  
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of Ontario].'']]    Hendrik (Heinrich) Niclaes was the founder of the [[Family of Love|Familists]] or the "House of Love," also called [[Nicolaites|Nicolaites]]. He was a native of [[Münster Anabaptists|Münster]], [[Westphalia (Germany)|Westphalia]], [[Germany|Germany]]. He had visions as a boy, entered a Latin school at the age of nine, but three years later worked in his father's business until he married and took over a business of his own. At the age of 27 he was arrested on a suspicion of Lutheran beliefs, and then moved to [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]]. Here he was arrested on a suspicion of being a "Münsterite." After his release he stayed nine years longer in Amsterdam. At the age of 39, while he was living in Emden, [[East Friesland (Niedersachsen, Germany)|East Friesland]], where he owned a thriving business, he had prophetic visions and gathered a following. When he was 59 he was again imprisoned and tried on the rack. He escaped to [[Kampen (Overijssel, Netherlands)|Kampen]], Dutch province of [[Overijssel (Netherlands)|Overijssel]], and from there to London and Cologne. He was a prolific writer. [[Nippold, Friedrich (1838-1918)|Nippold]] names 51 titles from his pen, which deal with a mystical pantheism.The disloyalty of some friends embittered the last years of his life. With [[David Joris (ca. 1501-1556)|David Joris ]]he carried on a brief literary dispute. Other [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]] connections cannot be claimed, as some older histories erroneously assert. In [[Netherlands|Holland]] he had few adherents. Only in [[Dordrecht (Zuid-Holland, Netherlands)|Dordrecht]] was there a group of followers until about 1614. Among his most influential followers was Christoffel Plantijn (1520-1589), noted printer at [[Antwerp (Belgium)|Antwerp]].
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= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Cramer, Samuel and Fredrik Pijper. <em>Bibliotheca Reformatoria Neerlandica</em>. 10 v. The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1903-1914: VII, <em>passim, </em>see Index.
 
Cramer, Samuel and Fredrik Pijper. <em>Bibliotheca Reformatoria Neerlandica</em>. 10 v. The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1903-1914: VII, <em>passim, </em>see Index.

Revision as of 14:02, 20 December 2013

Engraving from Apocalypsis, or The revelation of certain notorious advancers of heresie. London, 1655.
Scan provided  by the Mennonite Archives of Ontario.

Hendrik (Heinrich) Niclaes was the founder of the Familists or the "House of Love," also called Nicolaites. He was a native of Münster, Westphalia, Germany. He had visions as a boy, entered a Latin school at the age of nine, but three years later worked in his father's business until he married and took over a business of his own. At the age of 27 he was arrested on a suspicion of Lutheran beliefs, and then moved to Amsterdam. Here he was arrested on a suspicion of being a "Münsterite." After his release he stayed nine years longer in Amsterdam. At the age of 39, while he was living in Emden, East Friesland, where he owned a thriving business, he had prophetic visions and gathered a following. When he was 59 he was again imprisoned and tried on the rack. He escaped to Kampen, Dutch province of Overijssel, and from there to London and Cologne. He was a prolific writer. Nippold names 51 titles from his pen, which deal with a mystical pantheism.The disloyalty of some friends embittered the last years of his life. With David Joris he carried on a brief literary dispute. Other Anabaptist connections cannot be claimed, as some older histories erroneously assert. In Holland he had few adherents. Only in Dordrecht was there a group of followers until about 1614. Among his most influential followers was Christoffel Plantijn (1520-1589), noted printer at Antwerp.

Bibliography

Cramer, Samuel and Fredrik Pijper. Bibliotheca Reformatoria Neerlandica. 10 v. The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 1903-1914: VII, passim, see Index.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 224.

Kühler, Wilhelmus Johannes. Geschiedenis der Nederlandsche Doopsgezinden in de Zestiende Eeuw. Haarlem: H.D. Tjeenk Willink, 1932: 387-394.

Lindeboom, J. Stiefkinderen van het Christendom. The Hague, 1929: 201-209.

Nippold, F. "Heinrich Niclaes und das Haus der Liebe." Zeitschrift für die historische Theologie 3-4 (1862).


Author(s) Christian Neff
Date Published 1957


Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian. "Niclaes, Hendrik (1502-1580)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 30 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Niclaes,_Hendrik_(1502-1580)&oldid=105109.

APA style

Neff, Christian. (1957). Niclaes, Hendrik (1502-1580). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 30 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Niclaes,_Hendrik_(1502-1580)&oldid=105109.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 871. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.