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David Nitschmann (1696-5 October 1772), chief bishop of the [[Moravian Church|Moravian Brethren]], was consecrated on 13 March 1735, in Berlin, [[Germany|Germany]], in the home of the court chaplain Daniel Ernst Jablonski. He undertook many trips to America in the service of the Brethren. In this way he came to [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]], where he became the friend of [[Deknatel, Jeme (Joannes) (1698-1759)|Johannes Deknatel]], the pietistic Mennonite preacher. In 1738, while he and [[Zinzendorf, Count Nicholas Ludwig von (1700-1760)|Count Zinzendorf]] were staying in the Rönneburg Castle near Budingen, Hesse, he wrote a letter to Deknatel dated 19 June 1738. He also wrote a second letter to Deknatel from [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], dated 3 January 1741.   
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David Nitschmann (1696-5 October 1772), chief bishop of the [[Moravian Church|Moravian Brethren]], was consecrated on 13 March 1735, in Berlin, [[Germany|Germany]], in the home of the court chaplain Daniel Ernst Jablonski. He undertook many trips to America in the service of the Brethren. In this way he came to [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amsterdam]], where he became the friend of [[Deknatel, Jeme (Joannes) (1698-1759)|Johannes Deknatel]], the pietistic Mennonite preacher. In 1738, while he and [[Zinzendorf, Count Nicholas Ludwig von (1700-1760)|Count Zinzendorf]] were staying in the Rönneburg Castle near Budingen, Hesse, he wrote a letter to Deknatel dated 19 June 1738. He also wrote a second letter to Deknatel from [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], dated 3 January 1741.
 
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= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonitisches Lexikon, </em><span class="gameo_bibliography">4 vols</span>. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 264.
 
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonitisches Lexikon, </em><span class="gameo_bibliography">4 vols</span>. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 264.
  
 
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonitische Blätter</em> (1858): 32.
 
<em class="gameo_bibliography">Mennonitische Blätter</em> (1858): 32.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 889|date=1957|a1_last=Neff|a1_first=Christian|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 3, p. 889|date=1957|a1_last=Neff|a1_first=Christian|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Latest revision as of 18:53, 20 August 2013

David Nitschmann (1696-5 October 1772), chief bishop of the Moravian Brethren, was consecrated on 13 March 1735, in Berlin, Germany, in the home of the court chaplain Daniel Ernst Jablonski. He undertook many trips to America in the service of the Brethren. In this way he came to Amsterdam, where he became the friend of Johannes Deknatel, the pietistic Mennonite preacher. In 1738, while he and Count Zinzendorf were staying in the Rönneburg Castle near Budingen, Hesse, he wrote a letter to Deknatel dated 19 June 1738. He also wrote a second letter to Deknatel from Pennsylvania, dated 3 January 1741.

[edit] Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 264.

Mennonitische Blätter (1858): 32.


Author(s) Christian Neff
Date Published 1957


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian. "Nitschmann, David (1696-1772)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1957. Web. 18 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Nitschmann,_David_(1696-1772)&oldid=76389.

APA style

Neff, Christian. (1957). Nitschmann, David (1696-1772). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 18 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Nitschmann,_David_(1696-1772)&oldid=76389.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 3, p. 889. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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