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Peter Gael (Pieter Galen), an Anabaptist who after having participated in the revolt and the attack on Amsterdam city hall on 10-11 May, 1535, was put to death there in a very cruel way on 14 May 1535. He was typical of revolutionary Anabaptism. His confession contains important information concern­ing the extent and methods of revolutionary Anabaptism in the Netherlands (Holland). He revealed that this group wore a white ribbon on an arm and that they would kill all those not wearing such a ribbon. He also stated that Jacob van Campen, the Anabaptist bishop of Amsterdam, did not agree with their prac­tices and intentions. Peter Gail had been (re) bap­tized by Claes van Limmen, who is said to have been at Münster during Peter's trial.

[edit] Bibliography

Mellink, Albert F. De Wederdopers in de noordelijke Nederlanden 1531-1544. Groningen: J.B. Wolters, 1954,  passim, see Index.

Verhooren en Vonissen der Wederdoopers, betrokken bij de aanslagen op Amsterdam in 1534 en 1535, in Bijdragen en Mededeelingen van het Historisch Genootschap, vol. XLI. Amsterdam, 1920: 59-64.


Author(s) Nanne van der Zijpp
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. "Peter Gael (d. 1535)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 26 Mar 2017. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Peter_Gael_(d._1535)&oldid=109238.

APA style

Zijpp, Nanne van der. (1959). Peter Gael (d. 1535). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 March 2017, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Peter_Gael_(d._1535)&oldid=109238.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Kitchener, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 150. All rights reserved.


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