From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search
[unchecked revision][checked revision]
(CSV import - 20130816)
 
(CSV import - 20130820)
 
Line 4: Line 4:
  
 
In January 1945 Soviet troops overran the area and many Mennonites who had sought refuge in the area were returned to the Soviet Union.  At the end of the war the Warthegau again became the Poznań Voivodeship.  The borders of the province were redefined in 1975 and in 1988 it was superseded by Wielkopolska (Greater Poland) Voivodeship.
 
In January 1945 Soviet troops overran the area and many Mennonites who had sought refuge in the area were returned to the Soviet Union.  At the end of the war the Warthegau again became the Poznań Voivodeship.  The borders of the province were redefined in 1975 and in 1988 it was superseded by Wielkopolska (Greater Poland) Voivodeship.
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 385.
 
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 385.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 205|date=March 2008|a1_last=Crous|a1_first=Ernst|a2_last=Thiessen|a2_first=Richard D.}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 205|date=March 2008|a1_last=Crous|a1_first=Ernst|a2_last=Thiessen|a2_first=Richard D.}}

Latest revision as of 19:28, 20 August 2013

Poznań, located in the valley of the Warta (German Warthegau) in Poland. Originally part of the Kingdom of Poland, Poznan was formerly known as Posen, a Prussian province from 1848 to 1918.  At the end of World War I most of the province was handed over to Poland and it became known as the Poznań Voivodeship from 1921 to 1939. 

During World War II it was occupied by Nazi Germany and annexed as Reichsgau Posen, later known as Reichsgau Wartheland or Warthegau.  Hundreds of thousands of Poles were expelled from the area.  It was here that Mennon­ites from Galicia and Russia found temporary asylum during World War II, being settled on lands pro­vided by the German government.

In January 1945 Soviet troops overran the area and many Mennonites who had sought refuge in the area were returned to the Soviet Union.  At the end of the war the Warthegau again became the Poznań Voivodeship.  The borders of the province were redefined in 1975 and in 1988 it was superseded by Wielkopolska (Greater Poland) Voivodeship.

[edit] Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 385.


Author(s) Ernst Crous
Richard D. Thiessen
Date Published March 2008


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Crous, Ernst and Richard D. Thiessen. "Poznań Voivodeship (Poland)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. March 2008. Web. 29 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Pozna%C5%84_Voivodeship_(Poland)&oldid=84151.

APA style

Crous, Ernst and Richard D. Thiessen. (March 2008). Poznań Voivodeship (Poland). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 29 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Pozna%C5%84_Voivodeship_(Poland)&oldid=84151.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 205. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.