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Rabbit Lake is a village about 100 miles (160 km.) northwest of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, with the [[Hoffnungsfelder Mennonite Church (Rabbit Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Hoffnungsfeld Mennonite Church]] (MC) of 100 members (1957) a few miles outside the town. In 1926 the first settlers, who came to Canada from [[Russia|Russia]] in 1923 and the following years, settled here. In 1927, after clearing the land, the first crop was totally frozen. However, the newcomers did not give up. Soon two more stations to the east, [[Mullingar Mennonite Brethren Church (Mullingar, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Mullingar]] with a [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]] church which has been razed and Mayfair with the Hebron Mennonite Church of 26 members (1957), were settled, and two stations to the west, [[Hoffnungsfelder Mennonite Church (Bournemouth, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Bornemouth]], a member of the Hoffnungsfeld group of churches which has been razed and [[Glenbush Mennonite Brethren Church (Medstead, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Glenbush]] with a Mennonite Brethren church of 144 members (1957). The churches in Mullingar and Bornemouth were razed when the boom of the Rabbit Lake country collapsed in the 1930s. In 1957 there were in the area roughly 250 each of the Mennonite Brethren and [[Conference of Mennonites in Canada|Conference of Mennonites in Canada]] groups.
 
Rabbit Lake is a village about 100 miles (160 km.) northwest of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, with the [[Hoffnungsfelder Mennonite Church (Rabbit Lake, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Hoffnungsfeld Mennonite Church]] (MC) of 100 members (1957) a few miles outside the town. In 1926 the first settlers, who came to Canada from [[Russia|Russia]] in 1923 and the following years, settled here. In 1927, after clearing the land, the first crop was totally frozen. However, the newcomers did not give up. Soon two more stations to the east, [[Mullingar Mennonite Brethren Church (Mullingar, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Mullingar]] with a [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]] church which has been razed and Mayfair with the Hebron Mennonite Church of 26 members (1957), were settled, and two stations to the west, [[Hoffnungsfelder Mennonite Church (Bournemouth, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Bornemouth]], a member of the Hoffnungsfeld group of churches which has been razed and [[Glenbush Mennonite Brethren Church (Medstead, Saskatchewan, Canada)|Glenbush]] with a Mennonite Brethren church of 144 members (1957). The churches in Mullingar and Bornemouth were razed when the boom of the Rabbit Lake country collapsed in the 1930s. In 1957 there were in the area roughly 250 each of the Mennonite Brethren and [[Conference of Mennonites in Canada|Conference of Mennonites in Canada]] groups.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 240|date=1959|a1_last=Rempel|a1_first=John G|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 240|date=1959|a1_last=Rempel|a1_first=John G|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Latest revision as of 19:28, 20 August 2013

Rabbit Lake is a village about 100 miles (160 km.) northwest of Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, with the Hoffnungsfeld Mennonite Church (MC) of 100 members (1957) a few miles outside the town. In 1926 the first settlers, who came to Canada from Russia in 1923 and the following years, settled here. In 1927, after clearing the land, the first crop was totally frozen. However, the newcomers did not give up. Soon two more stations to the east, Mullingar with a Mennonite Brethren church which has been razed and Mayfair with the Hebron Mennonite Church of 26 members (1957), were settled, and two stations to the west, Bornemouth, a member of the Hoffnungsfeld group of churches which has been razed and Glenbush with a Mennonite Brethren church of 144 members (1957). The churches in Mullingar and Bornemouth were razed when the boom of the Rabbit Lake country collapsed in the 1930s. In 1957 there were in the area roughly 250 each of the Mennonite Brethren and Conference of Mennonites in Canada groups.


Author(s) John G Rempel
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Rempel, John G. "Rabbit Lake (Saskatchewan, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 26 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Rabbit_Lake_(Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=84268.

APA style

Rempel, John G. (1959). Rabbit Lake (Saskatchewan, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Rabbit_Lake_(Saskatchewan,_Canada)&oldid=84268.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 240. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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