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The Rainham Old Order Mennonite Church in Selkirk, Ontario was located on Lot 6, Concession 1 of Rainham Township on Fisherville Road. The congregation began services in 1889. The first building (shared with the Mennonite Conference of Ontario group) was occupied in 1836, with a subsequent building program in 1870. Leonard Hoover is considered the founding leader of the group. The congregation originated through division from the Mennonite Conference of Ontario in 1889 over the local group's reluctance to accept Sunday school, revival meetings, and the English language. The division occurred under the influence of Christian Gayman, bishop of the South Cayuga Old Order community.

Minister John D. Sherk served in 1955 as a non-salaried congregational leader. In 1925 there were 20 members; in 1950, 2. The congregation dissolved in 1955. It had been affiliated with the Old Order Mennonites (1889-1930), and the Markham Waterloo Mennonite Conference (1930-1955). The language of worship was English and German; the transition from German occurred in the 1940s.

[edit] Bibliography

Frey, Adam. "The Markham-Waterloo Conference of Ontario," Research paper, Conrad Grebel College, 1972, 38 pp.

Mennonites in Canada collection, MC (70-Markham-Waterloo), Mennonite Archives of Ontario.


Author(s) Joseph C. Fretz
Marlene Epp
Date Published April 1986


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Fretz, Joseph C. and Marlene Epp. "Rainham Old Order Mennonite Church (Selkirk, Ontario, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. April 1986. Web. 1 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Rainham_Old_Order_Mennonite_Church_(Selkirk,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=115556.

APA style

Fretz, Joseph C. and Marlene Epp. (April 1986). Rainham Old Order Mennonite Church (Selkirk, Ontario, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 1 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Rainham_Old_Order_Mennonite_Church_(Selkirk,_Ontario,_Canada)&oldid=115556.




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