Difference between revisions of "Remkes, Johann (1714-1770)"

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Johann Remkes, the last lay preacher of the [[Krefeld (Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany)|Krefeld]] Mennonite congregation, was born 16 March 1714, and was ordained to the min­istry on 17 October 1754, by Winand Wynands (b. 1702, preacher 1727-77). On 13 June 1769, Remkes as preacher and Heinrich van der Leyen as deacon, both aged men, wrote an illuminating let­ter to the Lam en Toren congregation of [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amster­dam]] asking for ministerial help. The letter gives much interesting information on the Krefeld congregation (see a long excerpt, <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em><em> </em>III, 647). Remkes died 3 January 1770. The first educated minister was then called in 1770; it was not de Vries, but [[Molenaar, Wopke (1739-1794)|Wopko Molenaar]] and Zino van Abbema.
 
Johann Remkes, the last lay preacher of the [[Krefeld (Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany)|Krefeld]] Mennonite congregation, was born 16 March 1714, and was ordained to the min­istry on 17 October 1754, by Winand Wynands (b. 1702, preacher 1727-77). On 13 June 1769, Remkes as preacher and Heinrich van der Leyen as deacon, both aged men, wrote an illuminating let­ter to the Lam en Toren congregation of [[Amsterdam (Noord-Holland, Netherlands)|Amster­dam]] asking for ministerial help. The letter gives much interesting information on the Krefeld congregation (see a long excerpt, <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em><em> </em>III, 647). Remkes died 3 January 1770. The first educated minister was then called in 1770; it was not de Vries, but [[Molenaar, Wopke (1739-1794)|Wopko Molenaar]] and Zino van Abbema.
 
 
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
<em>Beitrage zur Geschichte rheinischer Mennoniten. </em>Weierhof, 1939: 47, 81 f., 86 f., <em>et passim.</em>
 
<em>Beitrage zur Geschichte rheinischer Mennoniten. </em>Weierhof, 1939: 47, 81 f., 86 f., <em>et passim.</em>
  
 
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 467 f.
 
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 467 f.
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 295|date=1959|a1_last=Crous|a1_first=Ernst|a2_last=|a2_first=}}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 295|date=1959|a1_last=Crous|a1_first=Ernst|a2_last=|a2_first=}}

Revision as of 19:29, 20 August 2013

Johann Remkes, the last lay preacher of the Krefeld Mennonite congregation, was born 16 March 1714, and was ordained to the min­istry on 17 October 1754, by Winand Wynands (b. 1702, preacher 1727-77). On 13 June 1769, Remkes as preacher and Heinrich van der Leyen as deacon, both aged men, wrote an illuminating let­ter to the Lam en Toren congregation of Amster­dam asking for ministerial help. The letter gives much interesting information on the Krefeld congregation (see a long excerpt, Mennonitisches Lexikon III, 647). Remkes died 3 January 1770. The first educated minister was then called in 1770; it was not de Vries, but Wopko Molenaar and Zino van Abbema.

Bibliography

Beitrage zur Geschichte rheinischer Mennoniten. Weierhof, 1939: 47, 81 f., 86 f., et passim.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 467 f.


Author(s) Ernst Crous
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Crous, Ernst. "Remkes, Johann (1714-1770)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 29 Jul 2017. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Remkes,_Johann_(1714-1770)&oldid=84451.

APA style

Crous, Ernst. (1959). Remkes, Johann (1714-1770). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 29 July 2017, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Remkes,_Johann_(1714-1770)&oldid=84451.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 295. All rights reserved.


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