From GAMEO
Jump to: navigation, search
[unchecked revision][checked revision]
(CSV import - 20130820)
(CSV import - 20130823)
Line 1: Line 1:
[[File:Reutlingen.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Source: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Deutschland.svg Wikipedia Commons] Wikipedia Commons
+
[[File:Reutlingen.jpg|300px|thumb|right|''Source: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Deutschland.svg Wikipedia Commons]'']]    Reutlingen, a town (1951 population, 45,000; 2006 population, 112,000; coordinates: <span title="Latitude">48° 29′ 0″ N</span>, <span title="Longitude">9° 13′ 0″ E</span>) of Baden-[[Baden-Württemberg (Germany)|Württemberg]], [[Germany|Germany]], on the Echaz, 20 miles (33 km) south of Stuttgart, until 1802 a free imperial city. The preacher Matthäus Alber (1495-1570) thoughtfully introduced the Reformation here. Neither the dispute on communion, the [[Peasants' War, 1524-1525|Peasants' War]], nor the [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]] movement gained much ground here. [[Reublin, Wilhelm (1480/84-after 1559)|Wilhelm Reublin]] could accomplish nothing here in 1527. In the spring of 1527 some Anabaptists fled from [[Rottenburg am Neckar (Baden-Württemberg, Germany)|Rottenburg]] to Reutlingen, where some of them found refuge with Friedrich Frick, master of the shoemakers' guild, and some in the "tile hut." On 28 February 1528 the council prohibited the admittance of refugee Anabaptists. With friendliness and patient explanation Alber and his fellow preachers converted the Esslingen refugee Anabaptists back to the Lutheran faith, among them Leonhard Lutz, the master of the guild of vine dressers, so that they were permitted to return to [[Esslingen (Baden-Württemberg, Germany)|Esslingen]].
 
+
'']]    Reutlingen, a town (1951 population, 45,000; 2006 population, 112,000; coordinates: <span title="Latitude">48° 29′ 0″ N</span>, <span title="Longitude">9° 13′ 0″ E</span>) of Baden-[[Baden-Württemberg (Germany)|Württemberg]], [[Germany|Germany]], on the Echaz, 20 miles (33 km) south of Stuttgart, until 1802 a free imperial city. The preacher Matthäus Alber (1495-1570) thoughtfully introduced the Reformation here. Neither the dispute on communion, the [[Peasants' War, 1524-1525|Peasants' War]], nor the [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]] movement gained much ground here. [[Reublin, Wilhelm (1480/84-after 1559)|Wilhelm Reublin]] could accomplish nothing here in 1527. In the spring of 1527 some Anabaptists fled from [[Rottenburg am Neckar (Baden-Württemberg, Germany)|Rottenburg]] to Reutlingen, where some of them found refuge with Friedrich Frick, master of the shoemakers' guild, and some in the "tile hut." On 28 February 1528 the council prohibited the admittance of refugee Anabaptists. With friendliness and patient explanation Alber and his fellow preachers converted the Esslingen refugee Anabaptists back to the Lutheran faith, among them Leonhard Lutz, the master of the guild of vine dressers, so that they were permitted to return to [[Esslingen (Baden-Württemberg, Germany)|Esslingen]].
+
  
 
In the first decades of the 20th century several Mennonite families settled in and around Reutlingen. At first they were members of the Stuttgart congregation. In 1948, when the division of Germany into military zones (1945) hindered travel, a congregation was organized here. Increased by refugees who settled in the neighborhood, the congregation numbered 73 baptized members in 1957, with Fritz Hege and Daniel Schneider as elders.
 
In the first decades of the 20th century several Mennonite families settled in and around Reutlingen. At first they were members of the Stuttgart congregation. In 1948, when the division of Germany into military zones (1945) hindered travel, a congregation was organized here. Increased by refugees who settled in the neighborhood, the congregation numbered 73 baptized members in 1957, with Fritz Hege and Daniel Schneider as elders.

Revision as of 14:47, 23 August 2013

Reutlingen, a town (1951 population, 45,000; 2006 population, 112,000; coordinates: 48° 29′ 0″ N, 9° 13′ 0″ E) of Baden-Württemberg, Germany, on the Echaz, 20 miles (33 km) south of Stuttgart, until 1802 a free imperial city. The preacher Matthäus Alber (1495-1570) thoughtfully introduced the Reformation here. Neither the dispute on communion, the Peasants' War, nor the Anabaptist movement gained much ground here. Wilhelm Reublin could accomplish nothing here in 1527. In the spring of 1527 some Anabaptists fled from Rottenburg to Reutlingen, where some of them found refuge with Friedrich Frick, master of the shoemakers' guild, and some in the "tile hut." On 28 February 1528 the council prohibited the admittance of refugee Anabaptists. With friendliness and patient explanation Alber and his fellow preachers converted the Esslingen refugee Anabaptists back to the Lutheran faith, among them Leonhard Lutz, the master of the guild of vine dressers, so that they were permitted to return to Esslingen.

In the first decades of the 20th century several Mennonite families settled in and around Reutlingen. At first they were members of the Stuttgart congregation. In 1948, when the division of Germany into military zones (1945) hindered travel, a congregation was organized here. Increased by refugees who settled in the neighborhood, the congregation numbered 73 baptized members in 1957, with Fritz Hege and Daniel Schneider as elders.

(Based on articles by Horst Quiring and Gustav Bossert.)

Bibliography

Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, 56 vols. Leipzig, 1875-1912: I, 178.

Bossert, Gustav. "Der Reutlinger Sieg vom Jahre 1524," in Für die Feste und Freunde des Gustav-Adolf-Vereins. Barmen, 1894: 178.

Gayler, F. G. Historische Denkwürdigkeiten der ehemaligen freien Reichsstadt Reutlingen . . . bis 1577. Reutlingen, 1840.

Hartmann, Julius. Matthäus Alber, der Reformator der Reichsstadt Reutlingen. Tübingen, 1863.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. III, 481 f.

Keim, Karl Theodor. Reformationsblätter der Reichsstadt Esslingen. Esslingen, 1860.

Kepler, Fredrich. Die Marienkirche in Reutlingen . . . Reutlingen, 1947.

Pfaff, Karl. Geschichte der Stadt Esslingen. Esslingen, 1840.

Strole, Albrecht. Matthäus Alber, der Reformator Reutlingens. Reutlingen, 1895.

Volk, Julius. "Das Verhör des Reutlinger Reformators Dr. Matthäus Alber." Blätter für württembergische Kirchengeschichte (1926): 198 ff.

Maps

Map:Reutlingen, Baden-Württemberg


Author(s) Ernst Crous
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Crous, Ernst. "Reutlingen (Baden-Württemberg, Germany)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 20 Dec 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Reutlingen_(Baden-W%C3%BCrttemberg,_Germany)&oldid=96220.

APA style

Crous, Ernst. (1959). Reutlingen (Baden-Württemberg, Germany). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 December 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Reutlingen_(Baden-W%C3%BCrttemberg,_Germany)&oldid=96220.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 308. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.