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Saskatoon, SK, (pop. in 1959, 72,858; pop. in 2006, 206,900), chief commercial center of central Saskatchewan and site of the provincial university, had five Mennonite churches in the late 1950s (3 General Conference Mennonite (GCM) churches: First, 348 members; Mayfair (later known as Cornerstone), 115; Pleasant Hill, 28; 2 Mennonite Brethren (MB) churches: Saskatoon (later known as Central), 302; and City Mission Chapel (later known as West Portal), 22), and the headquarters office of the Canadian Mennonite Board of Colonization since 1947. The MB began work in the city in 1927, the GCM Church in 1930. The Mennonite population in the city was over 1200 in the late 1950s, including children. The nearest Mennonite congregations were 20 miles to the northwest at Dalmeny (Dalmeny Mennonite Brethren, [later known as Dalmeny Community Church], 262 members; Dalmeny Evangelical Mennonite Brethren (EMB), [later known as Dalmeny Bible Church], 212), 30 miles northwest at Langham (Langham EMB, 87; Langham Bruderthaler Mennonite Church (GCM), 178), 30 miles north at Hepburn (Hepburn MB, 241), and 30 miles south at Dundurn (Dundurn Mennonite Church (GCM), 293). Rosthern Mennonite Church is 60 miles north.

Author(s) Harold S Bender
Date Published 1959

Cite This Article

MLA style

Bender, Harold S. "Saskatoon (Saskatchewan, Canada)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 26 Nov 2015.,_Canada)&oldid=60630.

APA style

Bender, Harold S. (1959). Saskatoon (Saskatchewan, Canada). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 26 November 2015, from,_Canada)&oldid=60630.

Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 427. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.

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