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Schlabach (Slabaugh, Schlabaugh, Slabach, Schlappach), a Mennonite family name of Swiss origin. Peter Schlapbach, of Signau, canton of Bern, was an [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]] in 1538. The name is found among the Swiss Mennonite refugees in the [[Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Palatinate]] after 1664. [[Schlabach, Jakob (17th century)|Jakob Schlabach]] was expelled from the canton of Bern in 1660 for being an [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]]. [[Schlabach, Peter (1834-1906)|Peter Schlabach]], who was an elder in an [[Amish Mennonites|Amish]] congregation in Upper Hesse, Germany, served in the Prussian Landtag in the latter part of the 19th century. Johannes Slabach, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1733, may have been Amish and if so was perhaps the first representative of the Amish Schlabachs to come to America. Other Schlabach immigrants arrived in the 19th century. The brothers John and Christian Schlabach arrived in [[Somerset County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Somerset County]], [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]] in 1819. Their parents and family joined them the following year, and about five years later the entire family settled in [[Holmes County (Ohio, USA)|Holmes County]], [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]], where numerous descendants are found today. A Daniel Schlabach arrived in [[Fairfield County (Ohio, USA)|Fairfield County]], [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]], perhaps in 1834. Nearly all of his numerous descendants live in Holmes and Geauga counties, Ohio. Daniel's brother John settled in Fairfield County, Ohio, around 1838, but after his marriage he moved to [[Johnson County (Iowa, USA)|Johnson County]], [[Iowa (USA)|Iowa]], in 1851, where most of his descendants live. Another John Slabaugh who settled near [[Johnstown (Pennsylvania, USA)|Johnstown, Pennsylvania]], has descendants in Howard County, Indiana. Obituaries in Mennonite periodicals show that the family is scattered in at least twelve states, with Ohio, [[Indiana (USA)|Indiana]], [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], and Iowa leading. In 1937, at least seven bearing the family name were ministers in the [[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]] (MC), one in the [[Conservative Mennonite Conference|Conservative Mennonite Church]], and ten in [[Old Order Amish|Old Order Amish]] Mennonite churches, particularly in Holmes County, Ohio.
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Schlabach (Slabaugh, Schlabaugh, Slabach, Schlappach), a Mennonite family name of Swiss origin. Peter Schlapbach, of Signau, canton of Bern, was an [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]] in 1538. The name is found among the Swiss Mennonite refugees in the [[Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany)|Palatinate]] after 1664. [[Schlabach, Jakob (17th century)|Jakob Schlabach]] was expelled from the canton of Bern in 1660 for being an [[Anabaptism|Anabaptist]]. [[Schlabach, Peter (1834-1906)|Peter Schlabach]], who was an elder in an [[Amish Mennonites|Amish]] congregation in Upper Hesse, Germany, served in the Prussian Landtag in the latter part of the 19th century. Johannes Slabach, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1733, may have been Amish and if so was perhaps the first representative of the Amish Schlabachs to come to America. Other Schlabach immigrants arrived in the 19th century. The brothers John and Christian Schlabach arrived in [[Somerset County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Somerset County]], [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]] in 1819. Their parents and family joined them the following year, and about five years later the entire family settled in [[Holmes County (Ohio, USA)|Holmes County]], [[Ohio (USA)|Ohio]], where numerous descendants are found today. A Daniel Schlabach arrived in [[Fairfield County (Ohio, USA)|Fairfield County]], [[Ohio (USA)|Ohio]], perhaps in 1834. Nearly all of his numerous descendants live in Holmes and Geauga counties, Ohio. Daniel's brother John settled in Fairfield County, Ohio, around 1838, but after his marriage he moved to [[Johnson County (Iowa, USA)|Johnson County]], [[Iowa (USA)|Iowa]], in 1851, where most of his descendants live. Another John Slabaugh who settled near [[Johnstown (Pennsylvania, USA)|Johnstown, Pennsylvania]], has descendants in Howard County, Indiana. Obituaries in Mennonite periodicals show that the family is scattered in at least twelve states, with Ohio, [[Indiana (USA)|Indiana]], [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], and Iowa leading. In 1937, at least seven bearing the family name were ministers in the [[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]] (MC), one in the [[Conservative Mennonite Conference|Conservative Mennonite Church]], and ten in [[Old Order Amish|Old Order Amish]] Mennonite churches, particularly in Holmes County, Ohio.
 
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[[Category:Family Names]]

Latest revision as of 07:31, 12 April 2014

Schlabach (Slabaugh, Schlabaugh, Slabach, Schlappach), a Mennonite family name of Swiss origin. Peter Schlapbach, of Signau, canton of Bern, was an Anabaptist in 1538. The name is found among the Swiss Mennonite refugees in the Palatinate after 1664. Jakob Schlabach was expelled from the canton of Bern in 1660 for being an Anabaptist. Peter Schlabach, who was an elder in an Amish congregation in Upper Hesse, Germany, served in the Prussian Landtag in the latter part of the 19th century. Johannes Slabach, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1733, may have been Amish and if so was perhaps the first representative of the Amish Schlabachs to come to America. Other Schlabach immigrants arrived in the 19th century. The brothers John and Christian Schlabach arrived in Somerset County, Pennsylvania in 1819. Their parents and family joined them the following year, and about five years later the entire family settled in Holmes County, Ohio, where numerous descendants are found today. A Daniel Schlabach arrived in Fairfield County, Ohio, perhaps in 1834. Nearly all of his numerous descendants live in Holmes and Geauga counties, Ohio. Daniel's brother John settled in Fairfield County, Ohio, around 1838, but after his marriage he moved to Johnson County, Iowa, in 1851, where most of his descendants live. Another John Slabaugh who settled near Johnstown, Pennsylvania, has descendants in Howard County, Indiana. Obituaries in Mennonite periodicals show that the family is scattered in at least twelve states, with Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa leading. In 1937, at least seven bearing the family name were ministers in the Mennonite Church (MC), one in the Conservative Mennonite Church, and ten in Old Order Amish Mennonite churches, particularly in Holmes County, Ohio.


Author(s) Melvin Gingerich
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Gingerich, Melvin. "Schlabach family." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 24 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Schlabach_family&oldid=119603.

APA style

Gingerich, Melvin. (1959). Schlabach family. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 24 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Schlabach_family&oldid=119603.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, pp. 456-457. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.