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Slavgorod, a city in the region of [[Tomsk (Siberia, Russia)|Tomsk]] in the Kulundian Steppes, [[Siberia (Russia)|Siberia]], was established in the vicinity of the Barnaul (later [[Slavgorod Mennonite Settlement (Siberia, Russia)|Slavgorod) Mennonite settlement]] in 1909. The engineers in charge of building this city were Belyayev and Tchernov. Tchernov in particular, as a direct representative of the St. Petersburg government, helped the Mennonites in establishing the Slavgorod settlement. The city was planned so that lots 140 x 175 ft. could be rented. By 1913 the streets were lighted. Slavgorod soon developed into a business center, particularly for the Mennonites. A number of Mennonite businesses were established here. Cornelius P. Wiens, Peter A. Friesen, and Jakob Dück had grocery and dry goods stores. Peter P. Friesen and Franz P. Friesen operated a flour mill. Mills were also owned by Peter F. Klassen, Jakob C. Friesen, H. Hamra and H. Miller, David Hübert, and Heinrich Hübert. Among the dealers in farm machinery were Bernhard Friesen and Peter J. Wiens. All these businesses were confiscated after the [[Russian Revolution and Civil War|Revolution of 1917]]. After [[World War (1939-1945) - Soviet Union|World War II]] the town had a population of 16,000. It is located on a branch of the [[Railroads|Trans-Siberian railroad]], 250 miles west of Barnaul.
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Slavgorod, a city in the region of [[Tomsk (Siberia, Russia)|Tomsk]] in the Kulundian Steppes, [[Siberia (Russia)|Siberia]], was established in the vicinity of the Barnaul (later [[Slavgorod Mennonite Settlement (Siberia, Russia)|Slavgorod) Mennonite settlement]] in 1909. The engineers in charge of building this city were Belyayev and Tchernov. Tchernov in particular, as a direct representative of the St. Petersburg government, helped the Mennonites in establishing the Slavgorod settlement. The city was planned so that lots 140 x 175 ft. could be rented. By 1913 the streets were lighted. Slavgorod soon developed into a business center, particularly for the Mennonites. A number of Mennonite businesses were established here. Cornelius P. Wiens, Peter A. Friesen, and Jakob Dück had grocery and dry goods stores. Peter P. Friesen and Franz P. Friesen operated a flour mill. Mills were also owned by Peter F. Klassen, Jakob C. Friesen, H. Hamm and H. Miller, David Hübert, and Heinrich Hübert. Among the dealers in farm machinery were Bernhard Friesen and Peter J. Wiens. All these businesses were confiscated after the [[Russian Revolution and Civil War|Revolution of 1917]]. After [[World War (1939-1945) - Soviet Union|World War II]] the town had a population of 16,000. It is located on a branch of the [[Railroads|Trans-Siberian railroad]], 250 miles west of Barnaul.
  
 
In 1927 J. Wall, an [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]] (MB) minister, preached and conducted Bible conferences in the large Baptist church, which had been built in the previous year. Klaus Mehnert, who visited Slavgorod in 1955, reports that the population was about 30,000, of whom approximately one third were of German background. He found a Baptist church, which is also attended by the Mennonites. At the time of his visit German services were not yet permitted. Meanwhile this permission has been granted. The minister told Mehnert that they had 300 registered members, but that the attendance was larger than the capacity of the church. Permission had not yet been granted to enlarge the church.
 
In 1927 J. Wall, an [[Mennonite Brethren Church|Mennonite Brethren]] (MB) minister, preached and conducted Bible conferences in the large Baptist church, which had been built in the previous year. Klaus Mehnert, who visited Slavgorod in 1955, reports that the population was about 30,000, of whom approximately one third were of German background. He found a Baptist church, which is also attended by the Mennonites. At the time of his visit German services were not yet permitted. Meanwhile this permission has been granted. The minister told Mehnert that they had 300 registered members, but that the attendance was larger than the capacity of the church. Permission had not yet been granted to enlarge the church.

Latest revision as of 18:00, 25 November 2013

Slavgorod, a city in the region of Tomsk in the Kulundian Steppes, Siberia, was established in the vicinity of the Barnaul (later Slavgorod) Mennonite settlement in 1909. The engineers in charge of building this city were Belyayev and Tchernov. Tchernov in particular, as a direct representative of the St. Petersburg government, helped the Mennonites in establishing the Slavgorod settlement. The city was planned so that lots 140 x 175 ft. could be rented. By 1913 the streets were lighted. Slavgorod soon developed into a business center, particularly for the Mennonites. A number of Mennonite businesses were established here. Cornelius P. Wiens, Peter A. Friesen, and Jakob Dück had grocery and dry goods stores. Peter P. Friesen and Franz P. Friesen operated a flour mill. Mills were also owned by Peter F. Klassen, Jakob C. Friesen, H. Hamm and H. Miller, David Hübert, and Heinrich Hübert. Among the dealers in farm machinery were Bernhard Friesen and Peter J. Wiens. All these businesses were confiscated after the Revolution of 1917. After World War II the town had a population of 16,000. It is located on a branch of the Trans-Siberian railroad, 250 miles west of Barnaul.

In 1927 J. Wall, an Mennonite Brethren (MB) minister, preached and conducted Bible conferences in the large Baptist church, which had been built in the previous year. Klaus Mehnert, who visited Slavgorod in 1955, reports that the population was about 30,000, of whom approximately one third were of German background. He found a Baptist church, which is also attended by the Mennonites. At the time of his visit German services were not yet permitted. Meanwhile this permission has been granted. The minister told Mehnert that they had 300 registered members, but that the attendance was larger than the capacity of the church. Permission had not yet been granted to enlarge the church.

[edit] Bibliography

Fast, Gerhard. In den Steppen Sibiriens. Rosthern, 1957: 27 f.

Mehnert, Klaus. "Deutsche—vom Sturme verweht." Der Bote (5, 12, 19 September 1956).


Author(s) Cornelius Krahn
Date Published 1959


[edit] Cite This Article

MLA style

Krahn, Cornelius. "Slavgorod (Siberia, Russia)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 4 May 2016. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Slavgorod_(Siberia,_Russia)&oldid=104231.

APA style

Krahn, Cornelius. (1959). Slavgorod (Siberia, Russia). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 4 May 2016, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Slavgorod_(Siberia,_Russia)&oldid=104231.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 537. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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