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Eastern Mennonite Home in the 1960s. Image by Moser Studios, Souderton.
Souderton Mennonite Home (formerly Eastern Mennonite Home until the late 1980s), 207 West Summit Street, Souderton, Pennsylvania, is a retirement home in the Franconia Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church) though not officially under conference control. On 7 October 1915 the building of a home at Souderton was approved by the conference. Among the promoters were Andrew S. Mack, William M. Moyer, Henry Krupp, John S. Nice, Garret S. Nice, Joseph Bechtel, and W. R. Moyer. The home was opened for service on 17 May 1917. In 1921 an annex was built. The total cost of buildings and furnishings amounted to $100,000. The main building was 37 x 144 feet, an annex 36 x 96 feet, and one 36 x 36 feet, with 88 single beds and 13 double beds. The institution was supported by contributions and was free of debt in 1954. The officers in 1954 were Henry Delp, president; Oliver Nyce, vice-president; Norman Moyer, secretary; and John S. Nice, treasurer. The capacity of the Home was 84 residents.

In 2007 the Souderton Mennonite Home provided 170 apartments, 130 personal care rooms and 61 skilled nursing beds.



Author(s) J. C Clemens
Date Published 1956


Cite This Article

MLA style

Clemens, J. C. "Souderton Mennonite Home (Souderton, Pennsylvania, USA)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1956. Web. 22 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Souderton_Mennonite_Home_(Souderton,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=61014.

APA style

Clemens, J. C. (1956). Souderton Mennonite Home (Souderton, Pennsylvania, USA). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 22 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Souderton_Mennonite_Home_(Souderton,_Pennsylvania,_USA)&oldid=61014.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 2, p. 135. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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