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Hans Stenz, a Mennonite preacher in [[Aargau (Switzerland)|Aargau]], Switz­erland, a native of Setzwyl, but living in Kulm, a peasant, the father of five children, was arrested and sent to [[Bern (Switzerland)|Bern]], where he was tried with Martin Bruger<em> </em>on 1 and 6 March 1645, and 2 March 1646. On 7 January 1648, he had to answer to nine questions which were sent to him: separation, proclamation of the Word through preachers of the established church, the significance of the [[Old Testament|Old Testament]], [[Infant Baptism|infant baptism]], attitude toward government, holding of government office, [[Usury|interest]], [[Tithes|tithes]], taxes, etc., the right to wage war, the [[Oath|oath]], and the punishment of wicked persons. He gave excellent replies, which can be taken as the position of the Mennonites of the time. On 13 Januuary 1648, they were again ex­amined and asked whether they would not return to the church. Then Stenz replied that he could not burden his conscience, but would rather give his blood, if the Lord would give him grace; but he asked the government to be merciful. The council of Bern was determined to send them to the galleys as obstinate heretics; but "to spare their souls" they were put into the penitentiary in [[Zürich (Switzerland)|Zü­rich]]. Hans Stenz escaped and was caught; he was expelled and forced to promise that he would never return. He left with his wife and children; nothing more is known of him.
 
Hans Stenz, a Mennonite preacher in [[Aargau (Switzerland)|Aargau]], Switz­erland, a native of Setzwyl, but living in Kulm, a peasant, the father of five children, was arrested and sent to [[Bern (Switzerland)|Bern]], where he was tried with Martin Bruger<em> </em>on 1 and 6 March 1645, and 2 March 1646. On 7 January 1648, he had to answer to nine questions which were sent to him: separation, proclamation of the Word through preachers of the established church, the significance of the [[Old Testament|Old Testament]], [[Infant Baptism|infant baptism]], attitude toward government, holding of government office, [[Usury|interest]], [[Tithes|tithes]], taxes, etc., the right to wage war, the [[Oath|oath]], and the punishment of wicked persons. He gave excellent replies, which can be taken as the position of the Mennonites of the time. On 13 Januuary 1648, they were again ex­amined and asked whether they would not return to the church. Then Stenz replied that he could not burden his conscience, but would rather give his blood, if the Lord would give him grace; but he asked the government to be merciful. The council of Bern was determined to send them to the galleys as obstinate heretics; but "to spare their souls" they were put into the penitentiary in [[Zürich (Switzerland)|Zü­rich]]. Hans Stenz escaped and was caught; he was expelled and forced to promise that he would never return. He left with his wife and children; nothing more is known of him.
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe; Schneider, 1913-1967: v. IV.
+
Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. <em>Mennonitisches Lexikon</em>, 4 vols. Frankfurt &amp; Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. IV.
  
 
Heiz, J. <em>Täufer im Aargau.  </em>Aarau, 1902: 86.
 
Heiz, J. <em>Täufer im Aargau.  </em>Aarau, 1902: 86.

Revision as of 22:16, 19 January 2014

Hans Stenz, a Mennonite preacher in Aargau, Switz­erland, a native of Setzwyl, but living in Kulm, a peasant, the father of five children, was arrested and sent to Bern, where he was tried with Martin Bruger on 1 and 6 March 1645, and 2 March 1646. On 7 January 1648, he had to answer to nine questions which were sent to him: separation, proclamation of the Word through preachers of the established church, the significance of the Old Testament, infant baptism, attitude toward government, holding of government office, interest, tithes, taxes, etc., the right to wage war, the oath, and the punishment of wicked persons. He gave excellent replies, which can be taken as the position of the Mennonites of the time. On 13 Januuary 1648, they were again ex­amined and asked whether they would not return to the church. Then Stenz replied that he could not burden his conscience, but would rather give his blood, if the Lord would give him grace; but he asked the government to be merciful. The council of Bern was determined to send them to the galleys as obstinate heretics; but "to spare their souls" they were put into the penitentiary in Zü­rich. Hans Stenz escaped and was caught; he was expelled and forced to promise that he would never return. He left with his wife and children; nothing more is known of him.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. IV.

Heiz, J. Täufer im Aargau.  Aarau, 1902: 86.

Müller, Ernst. Geschichte der Bernischen Täufer. Frauenfeld: Huber, 1895. Reprinted Nieuwkoop : B. de Graaf, 1972: 106 ff., 182, 216.


Author(s) Christian Neff
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Neff, Christian. "Stenz, Hans (17th century)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 29 Jul 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Stenz,_Hans_(17th_century)&oldid=106122.

APA style

Neff, Christian. (1959). Stenz, Hans (17th century). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 29 July 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Stenz,_Hans_(17th_century)&oldid=106122.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 629. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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