From GAMEO
Revision as of 19:01, 20 August 2013 by GameoAdmin (Talk | contribs)


Jump to: navigation, search

Taufgesinnt, the German counterpart of the Dutch "Doopsgezind", was introduced into North Germany under Dutch influence as early as the mid 17th century as an alternate for the name Mennonite. But in Germany, contrary to the development in Holland, it never displaced "Mennonite" and never became part of an official name. In Switzerland, however, it was used by 1810 in a petition by the Langnau Mennonite congregation to the Bernese government, and it ultimately became a part of the official name of the Swiss Mennonite conference (see Altevangelische Wehrlose Taufgesinnten-Gemeinden). The name Taufgesinnt appeared in the titles of a considerable number of German books and booklets in the 18th and 19th centuries, but soon disappeared, and is now completely out of use. The first-known printed use of the name was in the 1660 West Prussian Confession, where the expression "Die vereinigte Flämische, Friesische und Hochdeutsche Tauffs-gesinnete oder Mennonisten in Preussen" is used. The first German edition of the Dordrecht Confession (1664), however, used only the name "Mennonisten," as did the 1678 Prussian confession. The standard general Mennonite history by Anna Brons carried the title Ursprung, Enttwickelung und Schicksale der Taufgesinnten oder Mennoniten in all three editions (1884, 1891, and 1912). The official periodicals did not use Taufgesinnt on their mastheads.


Author(s) Harold S Bender
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Bender, Harold S. "Taufgesinnt." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 23 Oct 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Taufgesinnt&oldid=78033.

APA style

Bender, Harold S. (1959). Taufgesinnt. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 23 October 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Taufgesinnt&oldid=78033.




Hpbuttns.gif
Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 686. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


©1996-2014 by the Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. All rights reserved.