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The Western District Amish Mennonite (AM) Conference was the counterpart of the [[Eastern Amish Mennonite Conference|Eastern Amish Mennonite Conference]] and included [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], [[Iowa (USA)|Iowa]], [[Missouri (USA)|Mis­souri]], [[Arkansas (USA)|Arkansas]], [[Kansas (USA)|Kansas]], [[Oklahoma (USA)|Oklahoma]], [[Nebraska (USA)|Nebraska]], [[Colorado (USA)|Col­orado]], and [[Oregon (USA)|Oregon]]. Following the discontinuance of the [[Amish Mennonites|Amish]] ministers' meetings of 1862-78 ([[Diener-Versammlungen|<em>Diener-Versammlungen</em>]]), the more progressive Amish leaders met occasionally for counsel and fellowship. One such informal meeting was held in Illinois around 1882 and another one in the Sycamore Grove church in Cass County, Missouri, in 1883. In 1884 these western Amish ministers held a conference in [[Henry County (Iowa, USA)|Henry County]], Iowa, at which time it was agreed to hold annual conferences, a plan which was followed from that date on. The earliest complete list of congrega­tions belonging to the conference is the 1905 sum­mary, which names 32 churches. A booklet entitled <em>Western District AM Conference. Record of Con­ference Proceedings from the Date of its Organiza­tion</em> begins with a report of the conference of 1890 held in the Sycamore Grove church, and ends with the conference of 1912, near [[Wayland (Iowa, USA)|Wayland]], Iowa. Al­though conferences were held before 1890, evidently it was in 1890 that the conference became completely organized. Subsequent annual reports end with 1920, the year in which a merger was effected between the Mennonite ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]) conferences west of Indiana and the Western Amish Mennonite Conference (this latter term was used interchangeably with "Western District A.M. Conference.") The five conferences affected by the merger were the Western Amish Mennonite, [[Pacific Coast Conference (Mennonite Church) |Pa­cific Coast]] (Old Mennonite Church),[[Illinois Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA) | Illinois]] (MC), [[Missouri-Iowa Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Missouri-Iowa]] (MC), and [[Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Kansas-Nebraska]] (MC). As a result of the merger the following five new Mennonite con­ferences appeared: [[Illinois Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Illinois]], [[Iowa-Nebraska Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Iowa-Nebraska]], [[Missouri-Kansas Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Mis­souri-Kansas]], Dakota-Montana, and Pacific Coast.
 
The Western District Amish Mennonite (AM) Conference was the counterpart of the [[Eastern Amish Mennonite Conference|Eastern Amish Mennonite Conference]] and included [[Illinois (USA)|Illinois]], [[Iowa (USA)|Iowa]], [[Missouri (USA)|Mis­souri]], [[Arkansas (USA)|Arkansas]], [[Kansas (USA)|Kansas]], [[Oklahoma (USA)|Oklahoma]], [[Nebraska (USA)|Nebraska]], [[Colorado (USA)|Col­orado]], and [[Oregon (USA)|Oregon]]. Following the discontinuance of the [[Amish Mennonites|Amish]] ministers' meetings of 1862-78 ([[Diener-Versammlungen|<em>Diener-Versammlungen</em>]]), the more progressive Amish leaders met occasionally for counsel and fellowship. One such informal meeting was held in Illinois around 1882 and another one in the Sycamore Grove church in Cass County, Missouri, in 1883. In 1884 these western Amish ministers held a conference in [[Henry County (Iowa, USA)|Henry County]], Iowa, at which time it was agreed to hold annual conferences, a plan which was followed from that date on. The earliest complete list of congrega­tions belonging to the conference is the 1905 sum­mary, which names 32 churches. A booklet entitled <em>Western District AM Conference. Record of Con­ference Proceedings from the Date of its Organiza­tion</em> begins with a report of the conference of 1890 held in the Sycamore Grove church, and ends with the conference of 1912, near [[Wayland (Iowa, USA)|Wayland]], Iowa. Al­though conferences were held before 1890, evidently it was in 1890 that the conference became completely organized. Subsequent annual reports end with 1920, the year in which a merger was effected between the Mennonite ([[Mennonite Church (MC)|Mennonite Church]]) conferences west of Indiana and the Western Amish Mennonite Conference (this latter term was used interchangeably with "Western District A.M. Conference.") The five conferences affected by the merger were the Western Amish Mennonite, [[Pacific Coast Conference (Mennonite Church) |Pa­cific Coast]] (Old Mennonite Church),[[Illinois Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA) | Illinois]] (MC), [[Missouri-Iowa Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Missouri-Iowa]] (MC), and [[Kansas-Nebraska Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Kansas-Nebraska]] (MC). As a result of the merger the following five new Mennonite con­ferences appeared: [[Illinois Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Illinois]], [[Iowa-Nebraska Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Iowa-Nebraska]], [[Missouri-Kansas Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church)|Mis­souri-Kansas]], Dakota-Montana, and Pacific Coast.
  
At the time of the dissolution of the Western AM Conference in 1920 the membership of that body was 4,388, in the following 32 congregations: Illinois (9) -- [[Hopedale Mennonite Church (Hopedale, Illinois, USA)|Hopedale]], [[Goodfield Mennonite Church (Goodfield, Illinois, USA)|Goodfield]], [[Roanoke Mennonite Church (Roanoke, Illinois, USA)|Roanoke]], [[Metamora Mennonite Church (Metamora, Illinois, USA)|Metamora]], [[East Bend Mennonite Church (Fisher, Illinois, USA)|East Bend]], [[Willow Springs Mennonite Church (Tiskilwa, Illinois, USA)|Willow Springs]], Ohio Station, [[Waldo Mennonite Church (Flanagan, Illinois, USA)|Waldo]], Pleasant Grove; Iowa (6) -- [[Sugar Creek Mennonite Church (Wayland, Iowa, USA)|Sugar Creek]], [[Lower Deer Creek Mennonite Church (Kalona, Iowa, USA)|Lower Deer Creek]], [[West Union Mennonite Church (Parnell, Iowa, USA)|West Union]], Daytonville, [[East Union Mennonite Church (Kalona, Iowa, USA)|East Union]], [[Cedar Creek Mennonite Church (Manson, Iowa, USA)|Cedar Creek]]; Missouri (2) -- [[Sycamore Grove Mennonite Church (Garden City, Missouri, USA)|Sycamore Grove]], Fairview; Arkansas—Stuttgart; Nebraska (7) -- [[East Fairview Mennonite Church (Milford, Nebraska, USA)|East Fairview]], [[Salem Mennonite Church (Shickley, Nebraska, USA)|Salem]], [[Plum Creek Mennonite Church (Beemer, Nebraska, USA)|Plum Creek]], [[Wood River Mennonite Church (Wood River, Nebraska, USA)|Wood River]], [[West Fairview Mennonite Church (Beaver Crossing, Nebraska, USA)|West Fairview]], [[East Fairview Mennonite Church (Milford, Nebraska, USA)|East Fairview]], ([[Chappell Mennonite Church (Chappell, Nebraska, USA)|Chappell]]), Slocum; Kansas -- [[Crystal Springs (Kansas, USA)|Crystal Springs]]; Oklahoma (2) -- [[Pleasant View Mennonite Church (Hydro, Oklahoma, USA)|Pleasant View]], AM of the Center Township at Pryor; Colorado --  [[Thurman Mennonite Church (Thurman, Colorado, USA)|Thurman]]; Oregon (3) -- [[Fairview Mennonite Church (Albany, Oregon, USA)|Fairview]], [[Zion Mennonite Church (Dallas, Oregon, USA)|Zion]], [[Bethel Mennonite Church (Canby, Oregon, USA)|Bethel]]. Ten outstanding leaders of the Western District AM Conference were [[Schlegel, Joseph (1837-1913)|Joseph Schlegel]] of Nebraska (1837-1913), in Iowa [[Gerig, Sebastian (1839-1924)|Sebastian Gerig]] (1839-1924) and Daniel Graber (1858-1930), in Missouri [[Hartzler, John J. (1845-1936)|John J. Hartzler]] (1845-1936), and in Illinois [[Smith, John (1843-1906)|John Smith]] (1843-1906), John C. Birky (1849-1920), Daniel Orendorff (1838-1918), [[Gerber, Samuel (1863-1929)|Samuel Gerber]] (1863-1929), [[Schrock, Andrew A. (1863-1949)|Andrew A. Schrock]] (1863-1949), and [[Hartzler, Chancy A. (1876-1947)|Chauncy A. Hartzler]] (1876-1947).
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At the time of the dissolution of the Western AM Conference in 1920 the membership of that body was 4,388, in the following 32 congregations: Illinois (9) -- [[Hopedale Mennonite Church (Hopedale, Illinois, USA)|Hopedale]], [[Goodfield Mennonite Church (Goodfield, Illinois, USA)|Goodfield]], [[Roanoke Mennonite Church (Roanoke, Illinois, USA)|Roanoke]], [[Metamora Mennonite Church (Metamora, Illinois, USA)|Metamora]], [[East Bend Mennonite Church (Fisher, Illinois, USA)|East Bend]], [[Willow Springs Mennonite Church (Tiskilwa, Illinois, USA)|Willow Springs]], Ohio Station, [[Waldo Mennonite Church (Flanagan, Illinois, USA)|Waldo]], Pleasant Grove; Iowa (6) -- [[Sugar Creek Mennonite Church (Wayland, Iowa, USA)|Sugar Creek]], [[Lower Deer Creek Mennonite Church (Kalona, Iowa, USA)|Lower Deer Creek]], [[West Union Mennonite Church (Parnell, Iowa, USA)|West Union]], Daytonville, [[East Union Mennonite Church (Kalona, Iowa, USA)|East Union]], [[Cedar Creek Mennonite Church (Manson, Iowa, USA)|Cedar Creek]]; Missouri (2) -- [[Sycamore Grove Mennonite Church (Garden City, Missouri, USA)|Sycamore Grove]], Fairview; Arkansas—Stuttgart; Nebraska (7) -- [[East Fairview Mennonite Church (Milford, Nebraska, USA)|East Fairview]], [[Salem Mennonite Church (Shickley, Nebraska, USA)|Salem]], [[Plum Creek Mennonite Church (Beemer, Nebraska, USA)|Plum Creek]], [[Wood River Mennonite Church (Wood River, Nebraska, USA)|Wood River]], [[West Fairview Mennonite Church (Beaver Crossing, Nebraska, USA)|West Fairview]], [[East Fairview Mennonite Church (Milford, Nebraska, USA)|East Fairview]], ([[Chappell Mennonite Church (Chappell, Nebraska, USA)|Chappell]]), Slocum; Kansas -- [[Crystal Springs Mennonite Church (Harper, Kansas, USA)|Crystal Springs]]; Oklahoma (2) -- [[Pleasant View Mennonite Church (Hydro, Oklahoma, USA)|Pleasant View]], AM of the Center Township at Pryor; Colorado --  [[Thurman Mennonite Church (Thurman, Colorado, USA)|Thurman]]; Oregon (3) -- [[Fairview Mennonite Church (Albany, Oregon, USA)|Fairview]], [[Zion Mennonite Church (Dallas, Oregon, USA)|Zion]], [[Bethel Mennonite Church (Canby, Oregon, USA)|Bethel]]. Ten outstanding leaders of the Western District AM Conference were [[Schlegel, Joseph (1837-1913)|Joseph Schlegel]] of Nebraska (1837-1913), in Iowa [[Gerig, Sebastian (1839-1924)|Sebastian Gerig]] (1839-1924) and Daniel Graber (1858-1930), in Missouri [[Hartzler, John J. (1845-1936)|John J. Hartzler]] (1845-1936), and in Illinois [[Smith, John (1843-1906)|John Smith]] (1843-1906), John C. Birky (1849-1920), Daniel Orendorff (1838-1918), [[Gerber, Samuel (1863-1929)|Samuel Gerber]] (1863-1929), [[Schrock, Andrew A. (1863-1949)|Andrew A. Schrock]] (1863-1949), and [[Hartzler, Chancy A. (1876-1947)|Chauncy A. Hartzler]] (1876-1947).
 
= Bibliography =
 
= Bibliography =
 
Gingerich, M. "Ten Leaders of the Western District Amish Mennonite Conference." <em>Mennonite Historical Bulletin </em>(October 1940): 1, 2, 3.
 
Gingerich, M. "Ten Leaders of the Western District Amish Mennonite Conference." <em>Mennonite Historical Bulletin </em>(October 1940): 1, 2, 3.

Revision as of 16:44, 30 March 2014

The Western District Amish Mennonite (AM) Conference was the counterpart of the Eastern Amish Mennonite Conference and included Illinois, Iowa, Mis­souri, Arkansas, Kansas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Col­orado, and Oregon. Following the discontinuance of the Amish ministers' meetings of 1862-78 (Diener-Versammlungen), the more progressive Amish leaders met occasionally for counsel and fellowship. One such informal meeting was held in Illinois around 1882 and another one in the Sycamore Grove church in Cass County, Missouri, in 1883. In 1884 these western Amish ministers held a conference in Henry County, Iowa, at which time it was agreed to hold annual conferences, a plan which was followed from that date on. The earliest complete list of congrega­tions belonging to the conference is the 1905 sum­mary, which names 32 churches. A booklet entitled Western District AM Conference. Record of Con­ference Proceedings from the Date of its Organiza­tion begins with a report of the conference of 1890 held in the Sycamore Grove church, and ends with the conference of 1912, near Wayland, Iowa. Al­though conferences were held before 1890, evidently it was in 1890 that the conference became completely organized. Subsequent annual reports end with 1920, the year in which a merger was effected between the Mennonite (Mennonite Church) conferences west of Indiana and the Western Amish Mennonite Conference (this latter term was used interchangeably with "Western District A.M. Conference.") The five conferences affected by the merger were the Western Amish Mennonite, Pa­cific Coast (Old Mennonite Church), Illinois (MC), Missouri-Iowa (MC), and Kansas-Nebraska (MC). As a result of the merger the following five new Mennonite con­ferences appeared: Illinois, Iowa-Nebraska, Mis­souri-Kansas, Dakota-Montana, and Pacific Coast.

At the time of the dissolution of the Western AM Conference in 1920 the membership of that body was 4,388, in the following 32 congregations: Illinois (9) -- Hopedale, Goodfield, Roanoke, Metamora, East Bend, Willow Springs, Ohio Station, Waldo, Pleasant Grove; Iowa (6) -- Sugar Creek, Lower Deer Creek, West Union, Daytonville, East Union, Cedar Creek; Missouri (2) -- Sycamore Grove, Fairview; Arkansas—Stuttgart; Nebraska (7) -- East Fairview, Salem, Plum Creek, Wood River, West Fairview, East Fairview, (Chappell), Slocum; Kansas -- Crystal Springs; Oklahoma (2) -- Pleasant View, AM of the Center Township at Pryor; Colorado --  Thurman; Oregon (3) -- Fairview, Zion, Bethel. Ten outstanding leaders of the Western District AM Conference were Joseph Schlegel of Nebraska (1837-1913), in Iowa Sebastian Gerig (1839-1924) and Daniel Graber (1858-1930), in Missouri John J. Hartzler (1845-1936), and in Illinois John Smith (1843-1906), John C. Birky (1849-1920), Daniel Orendorff (1838-1918), Samuel Gerber (1863-1929), Andrew A. Schrock (1863-1949), and Chauncy A. Hartzler (1876-1947).

Bibliography

Gingerich, M. "Ten Leaders of the Western District Amish Mennonite Conference." Mennonite Historical Bulletin (October 1940): 1, 2, 3.

Hartzler J. S. and Daniel Kauffman.  Mennonite Church History. Scottdale: Mennonite Book and Tract Society, 1905.


Author(s) Melvin Gingerich
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Gingerich, Melvin. "Western District Amish Mennonite Conference." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 20 Sep 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Western_District_Amish_Mennonite_Conference&oldid=116965.

APA style

Gingerich, Melvin. (1959). Western District Amish Mennonite Conference. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 September 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Western_District_Amish_Mennonite_Conference&oldid=116965.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, pp. 932-933. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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