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Konrad Winkler, an Anabaptist martyr of Wasserberg in the canton of Zürich, is the fourth martyr of the Zürich Swiss Brethren group. At a cross-examination in June 1525 he asserted that he had not baptized and promised to be obedient, but was nevertheless fined because he had contradicted the preacher in his sermon. Later Winkler appeared in the Zürich lowlands as an Anabaptist preacher. In Basel he also sought to promote the Anabaptist cause, but was arrested and placed in stocks with Jakob Treyer. On 20 January 1530, he was condemned to death at Zürich as "a real leader and mobster of this affair," who had for several months preached for large crowds and baptized many men and wom­en. He was drowned in the Limmat bound as Felix Manz had been. His property was confiscated.

Bibliography

Egli, Emil. Die Züricher Wiedertäufer zur Reformationszeit. Zurich, 1878: 89.

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. IV.

Muralt, Leonhard von  and Walter Schmid. Quellen zur Geschichte der Täufer in der Schweiz. Erster Band Zürich. Zürich: S. Hirzel, 1952: 332 f.  (where Winkler's importance is indicated by the length of the verdict).


Author(s) Samuel Geiser
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Geiser, Samuel. "Winkler, Konrad (d. 1530)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 20 Apr 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Winkler,_Konrad_(d._1530)&oldid=96881.

APA style

Geiser, Samuel. (1959). Winkler, Konrad (d. 1530). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 20 April 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Winkler,_Konrad_(d._1530)&oldid=96881.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 960. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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