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Ziegler is a Mennonite family name of Swiss origin. The name was formerly prominent in the [[Franconia Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Franconia Mennonite Conference (MC)]], and found also among the Mennonites and Amish Mennonites in [[Lancaster County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster]] and Butler counties, [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], and in eastern [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]]. Zieglers have also lived in [[Fulton County (Ohio, USA)|Fulton County]], Ohio, and in [[Cass County (Missouri, USA)|Cass County]], Missouri. Immigrant Michael Ziegler (ca. 1680-ca. 1765) was born in [[Germany|Germany]], migrated to America before 1717, settling in Perkiomen Township, now [[Montgomery County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Montgomery County]], Pennsylvania, and was affiliated as a minister with the Skippack congregation. He was one of the subscribers to the [[Dordrecht Confession of Faith (Mennonite, 1632)|Dordrecht Confession of Faith]] in 1725. His son Andreas (ca. 1707-ca. 1797), a son-in-law of [[Kolb, Dielman (1691-1756)|Preacher Dielman Kolb]], was ordained preacher in 1746 and bishop in 1762; he also served in the Skippack congregation and preaching circuit. He and Bishop Abraham Swartz deposed [[Funk, Christian (1731-1811)|Christian Funk]] from his office of preacher and bishop in 1778 for Funk's favorable attitude toward the American Colonies during their rebellion against the British Crown. Andreas Ziegler was one of the three signers and possibly chief author of a letter of 1 March 1773, from Skippack to Holland, giving much valuable information on the Pennsylvania Mennonites. (See <em>Mennonite Quarterly Review</em> III (1929): 225-34 for the text of the letter.) The Ziegler family has also played a major role in the life and history of the [[Church of the Brethren|Church of the Brethren]].
 
Ziegler is a Mennonite family name of Swiss origin. The name was formerly prominent in the [[Franconia Mennonite Conference (Mennonite Church USA)|Franconia Mennonite Conference (MC)]], and found also among the Mennonites and Amish Mennonites in [[Lancaster County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Lancaster]] and Butler counties, [[Pennsylvania (USA)|Pennsylvania]], and in eastern [[Ohio (State)|Ohio]]. Zieglers have also lived in [[Fulton County (Ohio, USA)|Fulton County]], Ohio, and in [[Cass County (Missouri, USA)|Cass County]], Missouri. Immigrant Michael Ziegler (ca. 1680-ca. 1765) was born in [[Germany|Germany]], migrated to America before 1717, settling in Perkiomen Township, now [[Montgomery County (Pennsylvania, USA)|Montgomery County]], Pennsylvania, and was affiliated as a minister with the Skippack congregation. He was one of the subscribers to the [[Dordrecht Confession of Faith (Mennonite, 1632)|Dordrecht Confession of Faith]] in 1725. His son Andreas (ca. 1707-ca. 1797), a son-in-law of [[Kolb, Dielman (1691-1756)|Preacher Dielman Kolb]], was ordained preacher in 1746 and bishop in 1762; he also served in the Skippack congregation and preaching circuit. He and Bishop Abraham Swartz deposed [[Funk, Christian (1731-1811)|Christian Funk]] from his office of preacher and bishop in 1778 for Funk's favorable attitude toward the American Colonies during their rebellion against the British Crown. Andreas Ziegler was one of the three signers and possibly chief author of a letter of 1 March 1773, from Skippack to Holland, giving much valuable information on the Pennsylvania Mennonites. (See <em>Mennonite Quarterly Review</em> III (1929): 225-34 for the text of the letter.) The Ziegler family has also played a major role in the life and history of the [[Church of the Brethren|Church of the Brethren]].
 
 
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 1026|date=1959|a1_last=Wenger|a1_first=John C|a2_last= |a2_first= }}
 
{{GAMEO_footer|hp=Vol. 4, p. 1026|date=1959|a1_last=Wenger|a1_first=John C|a2_last= |a2_first= }}

Revision as of 19:05, 20 August 2013

Ziegler is a Mennonite family name of Swiss origin. The name was formerly prominent in the Franconia Mennonite Conference (MC), and found also among the Mennonites and Amish Mennonites in Lancaster and Butler counties, Pennsylvania, and in eastern Ohio. Zieglers have also lived in Fulton County, Ohio, and in Cass County, Missouri. Immigrant Michael Ziegler (ca. 1680-ca. 1765) was born in Germany, migrated to America before 1717, settling in Perkiomen Township, now Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, and was affiliated as a minister with the Skippack congregation. He was one of the subscribers to the Dordrecht Confession of Faith in 1725. His son Andreas (ca. 1707-ca. 1797), a son-in-law of Preacher Dielman Kolb, was ordained preacher in 1746 and bishop in 1762; he also served in the Skippack congregation and preaching circuit. He and Bishop Abraham Swartz deposed Christian Funk from his office of preacher and bishop in 1778 for Funk's favorable attitude toward the American Colonies during their rebellion against the British Crown. Andreas Ziegler was one of the three signers and possibly chief author of a letter of 1 March 1773, from Skippack to Holland, giving much valuable information on the Pennsylvania Mennonites. (See Mennonite Quarterly Review III (1929): 225-34 for the text of the letter.) The Ziegler family has also played a major role in the life and history of the Church of the Brethren.


Author(s) John C Wenger
Date Published 1959


Cite This Article

MLA style

Wenger, John C. "Ziegler (Zeigler, Zigler) family." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1959. Web. 1 Nov 2014. http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Ziegler_(Zeigler,_Zigler)_family&oldid=79012.

APA style

Wenger, John C. (1959). Ziegler (Zeigler, Zigler) family. Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 1 November 2014, from http://gameo.org/index.php?title=Ziegler_(Zeigler,_Zigler)_family&oldid=79012.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, and Waterloo, Ontario, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 4, p. 1026. All rights reserved. For information on ordering the encyclopedia visit the Herald Press website.


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