Difference between revisions of "Brandenburg (Germany)"

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Brandenburg, a province of [[Prussia|Prussia]], which included [[Berlin (Germany)|Berlin]] until 1 April 1881. In the eastern part of the province, in [[Netzebruch (Poland)|Netzebruch]], there was at [[Brenkenhoffswalde and Franztal (Lubusz Voivodeship, Poland)|Brenkenhoffswalde]] near Driesen a Mennonite congregation founded in 1765 by 35 families from the [[Culm (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Culm]] lowlands ([[West Prussia|West Prussia]]), but extinct in 1834, since most of its members had emigrated to South [[Russia|Russia]]. A second Mennonite immigration into Brandenburg principally from West Prussia occurred after 1870 and led to the settlements near Berlin, especially in Schöneberg (1910, 63), Charlottenburg (1910, 50), Rixdorf-Neukölln (1910, 28), and Deutsch-Wilmersdorf (1910, 29), all now parts of Berlin. The membership grew steadily, as shown in the census statistics (the official source, <em>Preussische Statistik).</em>
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Brandenburg, a province of [[Prussia|Prussia]], which included [[Berlin (Germany)|Berlin]] until 1 April 1881. In the eastern part of the province, in [[Netzebruch (Poland)|Netzebruch]], there was at [[Brenkenhoffswalde and Franztal (Lubusz Voivodeship, Poland)|Brenkenhoffswalde]] near Driesen a Mennonite congregation founded in 1765 by 35 families from the [[Culm (Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship, Poland)|Culm]] lowlands ([[West Prussia|West Prussia]]), but extinct in 1834, since most of its members had immigrated to South [[Russia|Russia]]. A second Mennonite immigration into Brandenburg principally from West Prussia occurred after 1870 and led to the settlements near Berlin, especially in Schöneberg (1910, 63), Charlottenburg (1910, 50), Rixdorf-Neukölln (1910, 28), and Deutsch-Wilmersdorf (1910, 29), all now parts of Berlin. The membership grew steadily, as shown in the census statistics (the official source, <em>Preussische Statistik).</em>
  
 
<table align="center" border="1">  <tr> <td><em>District</em></td> <td>1880</td> <td>1885</td> <td>1890</td> <td>1895</td> <td>1900</td> <td>1905</td> <td>1910</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Potsdam</td> <td> <div align="right">14</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">21</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">58</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">108</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">159</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">182</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">302</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>Frankfurt</td> <td> <div align="right">4</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">9</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">18</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">18</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">8</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">12</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">26</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td><strong>Total</strong></td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>18</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>30</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>76</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>126</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>167</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>194</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>328</strong></div> </td> </tr>  </table> The great preponderance of men is conspicuous (1910, 189 men, 139 women), and is explained by the immigration of young men working and studying in the city. The Brandenburg Mennonites belong to the [[Berlin (Germany)|Berlin congregation]].
 
<table align="center" border="1">  <tr> <td><em>District</em></td> <td>1880</td> <td>1885</td> <td>1890</td> <td>1895</td> <td>1900</td> <td>1905</td> <td>1910</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Potsdam</td> <td> <div align="right">14</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">21</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">58</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">108</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">159</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">182</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">302</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>Frankfurt</td> <td> <div align="right">4</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">9</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">18</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">18</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">8</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">12</div> </td> <td> <div align="right">26</div> </td> </tr> <tr> <td><strong>Total</strong></td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>18</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>30</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>76</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>126</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>167</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>194</strong></div> </td> <td> <div align="right"><strong>328</strong></div> </td> </tr>  </table> The great preponderance of men is conspicuous (1910, 189 men, 139 women), and is explained by the immigration of young men working and studying in the city. The Brandenburg Mennonites belong to the [[Berlin (Germany)|Berlin congregation]].

Revision as of 07:30, 20 November 2016

Brandenburg, a province of Prussia, which included Berlin until 1 April 1881. In the eastern part of the province, in Netzebruch, there was at Brenkenhoffswalde near Driesen a Mennonite congregation founded in 1765 by 35 families from the Culm lowlands (West Prussia), but extinct in 1834, since most of its members had immigrated to South Russia. A second Mennonite immigration into Brandenburg principally from West Prussia occurred after 1870 and led to the settlements near Berlin, especially in Schöneberg (1910, 63), Charlottenburg (1910, 50), Rixdorf-Neukölln (1910, 28), and Deutsch-Wilmersdorf (1910, 29), all now parts of Berlin. The membership grew steadily, as shown in the census statistics (the official source, Preussische Statistik).

District 1880 1885 1890 1895 1900 1905 1910
Potsdam
14
21
58
108
159
182
302
Frankfurt
4
9
18
18
8
12
26
Total
18
30
76
126
167
194
328

The great preponderance of men is conspicuous (1910, 189 men, 139 women), and is explained by the immigration of young men working and studying in the city. The Brandenburg Mennonites belong to the Berlin congregation.

Bibliography

Hege, Christian and Christian Neff. Mennonitisches Lexikon, 4 vols. Frankfurt & Weierhof: Hege; Karlsruhe: Schneider, 1913-1967: v. I, 255.


Author(s) Christian Hege
Date Published 1953


Cite This Article

MLA style

Hege, Christian. "Brandenburg (Germany)." Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. 1953. Web. 28 Feb 2020. https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Brandenburg_(Germany)&oldid=141053.

APA style

Hege, Christian. (1953). Brandenburg (Germany). Global Anabaptist Mennonite Encyclopedia Online. Retrieved 28 February 2020, from https://gameo.org/index.php?title=Brandenburg_(Germany)&oldid=141053.




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Adapted by permission of Herald Press, Harrisonburg, Virginia, from Mennonite Encyclopedia, Vol. 1, p. 404. All rights reserved.


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